Canadians face obstacles to investing

first_img More than half of U.S. millennials actively contribute to retirement accounts: survey Leah Golob Canadians more focused on saving than paying down debt: survey Related news More than one-third of Canadians (36%) don’t have an investment account and, among those non-investors, only 4% have seriously contemplated opening one. Most Canadian non-investors (70%) say they don’t have the money to invest. Other concerns among non-investors are that they might lose money if they start investing (25%) and that investing is too complex (20%). What’s notable, however, is that 67% of non-investors agree that investing should be a priority, even if they are in debt. Among reasons they would invest, 50% cite retirement, 36% say faster growth, and 29% say to save for a large purchase such as a child’s education, a vacation or a house. “Unfortunately there’s a misconception out there that you need to be an expert with a lot of money to start investing, and this simply isn’t true,” says David McGann, director of Tangerine Investments, in a statement. One important revelation in the study is that 33% of “up and coming” adults, age 26 to 36, have considered or seriously considered opening an investment account, while only 24% of “established” adults, age 40 to 54, had considered doing so. Furthermore, the study shows that the established adults experience more hurdles to investing than their younger counterparts. For example, 72% of the older demographic say they don’t have enough money to invest, compared with 62% of the up-and-coming adults. Established adults are less likely to invest even if they have a trusted option with proven results (29%), they would not incur high fees (23%) and would have access to using automatic investing options (21%). Among Canadians who already are investing, 72% say they began before the age of 34. This statistic appears to be in keeping with further reports that demonstrate more up-and-coming adults (64%) have opened an investment account, compared with established adults (55%). The top reasons for investing include retirement savings (64%), followed by financial security (56%), the ability to grow money faster (45%) and a big purchase such as a vacation or a child’s education (23%). The survey of 1,510 Canadian adults was conducted by Angus Reid on August 30 and 31. Canadians face obstacles to investing kovaleff/123RF Share this article and your comments with peers on social media A large proportion of Canadians say there are significant obstacles that prevent them from opening their first investment account, according to a recent survey conducted on behalf of Tangerine Bank, a subsidiary of Toronto-based Bank of Nova Scotia. Keywords Consumer borrowing and saving One in five Canadians will need to liquidate an asset to pay for debt: survey Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Labor welcomes moves for criminal trials without juries

first_imgLabor welcomes moves for criminal trials without juries Tasmanian LaborJudge only trials a sensible moveMust be voluntary, and the choice of the defenceConsultation essential to ensure right to a fair trial and access to justiceLabor has welcomed moves by the government to introduce judge only criminal trials.Shadow Attorney General and Shadow Minister for Justice Ella Haddad said it’s appropriate for Tasmania to follow the precedent established in other states.“The legal profession and prisoner advocates have been calling on the government to act, and we’re pleased to see that happen.“This is an important change to the legal system, but must be the choice of the defendant, not imposed by the prosecution or court.“This is one way to reduce the backlog in our overburdened criminal justice system. COVID restrictions, which have led to suspension of jury trials, have only made that backlog worse.“I urge Elise Archer to consult thoroughly to ensure this legislation does everything it can to increase access to justice and the right to a fair trial for the accused.“While today’s announcement is welcome, it’s not a silver bullet for the problems in Tasmania’s criminal justice system. Backlogs are also affected by lack of access to legal assistance, an increasing prison population and unmet legal need across the community.“The Liberals must act to ensure all these issues are addressed.”Ella HaddadShadow Attorney GeneralShadow Minister for Justice /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:attorney-general, community, court, Criminal, criminal justice, Government, justice, legislation, Minister, Prison, prosecution, Tasmania, Tasmanian Labor, Tassie, triallast_img read more

Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations and American Council of Engineering Companies Sign Memorandum

first_imgBureau of Overseas Buildings Operations and American Council of Engineering Companies Sign Memorandum On November 16, 2020, the Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) and the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in support of improving the implementation of OBO’s design and construction program and the value of the engineering disciplines and engineering services that support OBO’s mission. The MOU solidifies and builds on the communication and collaboration already underway and further bolsters the relationship between OBO and the building industry.The MOU outlines several opportunities for collaboration between the organizations, including: embracing innovative business practices that enhance the security, quality, value, and sustainability of OBO projects; utilizing appropriate emerging technologies; advancing education and research and development; and promoting qualifications-based selection of the procurement of architecture and engineering services.The MOU was signed by OBO Director Addison D. “Tad” Davis, IV and ACEC CEO and President Linda Bauer Darr on behalf of their respective organizations.OBO provides safe, secure, functional, and resilient facilities that represent the U.S. Government to the host nation and that support U.S. diplomats in advancing U.S. foreign policy objectives abroad. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:america, american, architecture, building, business, communication, council, Department of State, education, Engineering, Government, industry, President, quality, research, security, sustainabilitylast_img read more

Study better, learn better with these tips from academic coaches

first_img Published: Sept. 8, 2020 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail As you continue to settle into the semester and into your classes, you may still be adjusting to different learning environments. Here are some tips from academic coaches to help you succeed this semester.How are your organizational skills?Staying organized is one of the best skills you can have throughout your college journey. Being organized can help you clearly see the tasks you need to accomplish. While taking remote and in-person classes this semester, consider if your organizational system is working for you. If you find yourself struggling to stay organized, here are three ways to help you get back on track:Keep your learning supplies organized. Assign a physical place for your textbooks, notes and other class materials to make it easier to find these resources the next time you have class or need to study. Keep your workspace organized. The less distractions you have around you when you are studying or taking classes on Zoom, the easier time you’ll have staying focused. Be mindful of common distractions such as cell phones and applications on your computer. Check out ways to navigate in-person, remote or hybrid classes.Keep an agenda, calendar or whatever works for you handy. Having one place to refer back to for project deadlines, exams and other class-related material can help you stay on top of your responsibilities. How are you studying?Check in with yourself about your study habits outside of class, and try the “study cycle” method to help you stay motivated.Before class, preview the material you’ll be covering. Skim the chapter, pay attention to headings and bold words, review chapter summaries and prepare any questions you have.Attend your class—take notes and ask questions.Actively review your notes as soon as you can after class. Try summarizing your notes and applying concepts from your notes. Try to teach the concepts from your notes out loud. Schedule time in your week to study the material again. Review your notes, handouts and any other readings.Be sure you are studying at the level of critical thinking necessary to show your understanding on exams. See Bloom’s Taxonomy and Critical Thinking. Repeat this process for each of your classes to ensure you are better prepared for exams, and try the seven-day study plan to find what works for you. How are you staying connected to others?It’s important to stay connected and find your community at CU. Here are some ways to stay connected:Set up Zoom study groups. Whether you’re reviewing notes or studying for an exam, having a group of people you can virtually get together with can make a big difference. Reach out to your instructors. Remember, your professors want you to succeed. If you find that you are struggling with the material or have other concerns, attend office hours to get the clarity you need. Connect with CU in different ways. Be sure to check your email and read CU Boulder Today. Check out upcoming events, volunteer and leadership opportunities and other ways to get involved. How are you balancing academics and life?One of the great aspects of your CU journey is building independence and learning to find balance. How you spend your time outside of the classroom is just as important as what you do during class.  Think about how you are planning time to study and review notes, and how that time is getting you closer to your academic goals.Take care of yourself to stay balanced and keep your energy up. Aim to get seven to nine hours of sleep each night, eat regular and balanced meals and make time for physical activity. Also, take time to connect with others and enjoy your favorite hobbies. Categories:Stress LessCampus Community Academic resourcesAcademic Success Resource Library: This library gives you specific tools and tips to help you consider new approaches to studying, task management and more.Get remote learning guidance, including resources, guidance for watching online lectures, tutorials for taking quizzes and exams and more.Managing stressCounseling and Psychiatric Services: CAPS offers telehealth (virtual) counseling appointments for undergrad and graduate students. New students or students who have not been seen in the past year should make an appointment through their MyCUHealth portal. Current students can call 303-492-2277 or connect with their provider to make an appointment.Wellness Wednesdays: This weekly program provides a space to engage in self-care activities, learn about campus resources and build community. Students can participate in the activity and have a one-on-one conversation with an emotional wellness peer educator to create a personalized self-care plan. E-Let’s Talk: E-Let’s Talk is a free service offered by CAPS where students can check in via telehealth for an informal and confidential consultation with a counselor. Students commonly visit with concerns about stress, sadness, worry and more. Let’s Talk counselors can help provide insight, solutions and information about additional resources. Learn more about e-Let’s Talk hours.SilverCloud online mental health program: Take charge and manage your emotional health and well-being with SilverCloud, an online tool that provides personalized programs to help build skills around stress management, anxiety and depression.last_img read more

HEART North East Region Boasts 100 Percent Job Placement for 2013/14

first_imgRelatedGround Broken for Auditorium at Brown’s Town High School HEART Trust/NTA graduates , he noted further, continue to reap many social benefits from their training and it has been found that “more training through HEART Trust/NTA leads to reduced vulnerability, increased employment opportunities, and greater security for the family.”Keynote speaker and Managing Director of Future Services International, Yaneek Page, charged the graduates to be bold in pursuit of their dreams, noting that “fear has killed more dreams than failure ever will.”She related that when she started Future Services International, she had resigned “a fantastic job” at a well established private sector company.“I had so many people who said, ‘it is not going to work. You are going to spend money to finance justice, how that is going to work’. My business is six years old today… We have helped thousands (of) Jamaicans (to) access the formal justice system. I have had people from the Caribbean and all over the world …asking me how I can help them (to) create something similar in their country,” she said.She urged the graduates to “work for a cause and not for applause, live life to express, not to impress. Don’t strive to make your presence felt, (but strive to) make your absence felt.” HEART North East Region Boasts 100 Percent Job Placement for 2013/14 EducationNovember 15, 2014Written by: Sharon Earle Advertisements The HEART Trust/NTA North East Region is boasting a record 100 percent success rate in its trainee placement programme for the 2013/14 academic year.Regional Director for Employment and Career Services, Althea Smikle-Martin, said that the 800 trainees for the period were all successfully placed in permanent employment solutions shortly after graduation.Ms Smikle-Martin was delivering her report at the certification ceremony for the North East Region held on November 12, at the Moneague College in St. Ann.Some 350 graduates from the five HEART skills training centres in the region, covering the parishes of Trelawny, St. Mary and St. Ann, received certificates of competence in 17 disciplines at levels one to three.The region, during the review year, also surpassed its enrolment target of 2, 646 with 6, 501 trainees, and its certification target of 2, 255 with 2, 466 graduates.Senior Director for the Workforce Development and Employment Division, Denworth Finnikin, noted that research conducted by HEART Trust/NTA on Skills Demand and Employers’ Satisfaction  in August 2014, revealed that employers were 90.5 per cent satisfied with HEART trained graduates and the services offered by the Trust.This is welcomed news as the HEART Trust intensifies on-the-job training to meet labour market demand.“Research also showed a high level of employer satisfaction with employees, who are graduates of the HEART Trust /NTA, particularly in areas such as communication skills (oral and written); productivity; quality of work (ability to meet quality demands); computer skills; co-operativeness (ability to work with others); acceptance of advice and supervision; technical use of  tools and equipment; ability to use own initiative; and problem solving skills,” Mr. Finnikin pointed out. RelatedCHASE Signs MOU for Training of Early Childhood Teachers RelatedStudents Urged to Make Use of School Life Story HighlightsThe HEART Trust/NTA North East Region is boasting a record 100 percent success rate in its trainee placement programme for the 2013/14 academic year.Regional Director for Employment and Career Services, Althea Smikle-Martin, said that the 800 trainees for the period were all successfully placed in permanent employment solutions shortly after graduation.Some 350 graduates from the five HEART skills training centres in the region, covering the parishes of Trelawny, St. Mary and St. Ann, received certificates of competence in 17 disciplines at levels one to three. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail last_img read more

Azinger looks back at only major

first_imgST. LOUIS – Even with ample reason to think about what might have been, Paul Azinger prefers to wonder what’s next. This was one time he reluctantly agreed to celebrate the past. He returned to Inverness Club over the weekend, his first time at the Ohio club since he reached the pinnacle of his career 25 years ago. He never imagined then that his golf would never be better. Azinger won his only major at the 1993 PGA Championship with four birdies over the last seven holes for a 30 on the back nine, eliminating the likes of Nick Faldo and Vijay Singh, Tom Watson and Hale Irwin, and then beating Greg Norman on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff. All five are in the Hall of Fame. ”I loved being back there,” Azinger said. ”It’s nice to reminisce, and I remembered a lot about that week. It’s not like me to celebrate, but I did it.” The celebration 25 years ago didn’t last long. His right shoulder had been bothering him that year. Orthopedic surgeon Frank Jobe called him Friday night during that PGA Championship to say results from a bone scan were in and it didn’t look good. Azinger asked if it could wait until after the Ryder Cup. Finding calm in a storm, he won the PGA Championship. Finding the fight that enabled him to win 12 times on the PGA and twice more in Europe, he battled Faldo to a draw in Ryder Cup singles during a U.S. victory in England. And then he was told he had cancer. The diagnosis was non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which required six months of chemotherapy and radiation. ”You don’t ever try to imagine what would have happened without getting sick,” Azinger said. ”As you get older, you start to think more about it. I was a pretty confident player. I might not have been No. 1, but in my brain I was. I had a ridiculous run.” How long would it have lasted? He’ll never know. ”There’s two ways to look at it,” said Curtis Strange, the two-time U.S. Open champion who picked Azinger for his Ryder Cup team in 2002. ”Yes, his golf career was cut short. He really was a special player. He did it his way. He believed in his way, and that’s all that matters. On the other hand, you look at what he had to overcome. His life was different. But he came back and won, he played well, and he’s done a tremendous job in the TV world.” Even with his best golf behind him, cut short by the invasion of cancer at 33, Azinger still managed to leave a mark in golf. He still does. He always wonders what’s next. Azinger won for the last time in 2000, a seven-shot victory at the Sony Open that was best remembered for the long putter he stuck into his belly. That was what first brought attention to a new way of putting. A generation later, when Keegan Bradley at the PGA Championship and Webb Simpson at the U.S. Open won majors with the belly putter, the governing bodies decided to ban the anchored stroke. He also made it back to another Ryder Cup team, primarily off the strength of that victory in Hawaii. Even though he was No. 22 in the standings, Strange picked him. And then the matches were moved back a year because of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, and Azinger had fallen outside the top 50 in the world. He went 0-1-1 for the week, yet both matches were memorable. Azinger and Tiger Woods combined for a 63 and still lost when Thomas Bjorn, after Azinger had hit 7-iron to 5 inches on the 18th hole, made a 20-foot birdie. In singles, with the Ryder Cup very much undecided, Azinger was 1 down to Niclas Fasth and in the bunker left of the 18th green. ”I said to my caddie, ‘I’ve got to hole this, don’t I?’ And he didn’t say one word,” Azinger said. ”And then I holed it. That was a moment I’ll never forget.” Europe wound up winning when Paul McGinley made the winning putt against Jim Furyk. That started a run of European dominance that was stopped by Azinger, who brought a maverick way of thinking to the matches when he was appointed captain. Azinger demanded an overhaul of the points system and asked for four captain’s picks instead of two, a model now in place. He also broke his team into three units and, using personality models, allowed players who qualified for the team to choose the wild-card selections. The U.S. won that year at Valhalla in 2008, and Azinger’s model was cited by Phil Mickelson when he criticized Tom Watson after the 2014 loss at Gleneagles, which led to players having more control. The Americans won the next Ryder Cup, and the U.S. team now looks strong as ever. If it’s not Azinger’s system, his fingerprints are all over it. Does he get enough credit for it? Maybe in some corners. Azinger really doesn’t care. Twenty-five years ago, he had reason to believe he would have won a lot more, even more majors. He might be in the Hall of Fame now, just like the players he beat that day at Inverness. The trip to Ohio allowed him to look back, and he found only happy memories. ”I’ve had an exciting life,” he said.last_img read more

Education Funding Plan Goes Back to Committee

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. HELENA – Senate Republicans searching for votes on their primary education funding plan sent the measure back to committee for more tinkering.The Thursday move followed a floor vote on Wednesday where the measure deadlocked 25-25.Republicans hold a 28-22 advantage in the chamber, but face some opposition from those within their ranks worried about how it treats some resource-rich rural areas. Democrats are opposing it, arguing they like Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s education plan better.Senate leaders have said they may need to take more money out of their education funding plan in order to get enough Republican votes to advance the measure.House Republicans have been cool toward the idea, and even crafted a main budget bill that prepared for its failure. Emaillast_img read more

The Whitefish TIF Debate

first_img Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. What Whitefish city officials know is that they will have millions of tax increment finance dollars available for infrastructure projects in the coming years. What they don’t know is exactly how to spend those millions.And at the heart of that question, especially in recent months, is how much can and should be divvied out to a new City Hall and an updated high school. The city council is expected to give staff direction on addressing that question at a Nov. 7 public meeting.“Financially I think there’s room for both,” City Manager Chuck Stearns said in an interview last week. “They just have to decide how they want to consider including the school and to what level.”In mid-October, the Whitefish City Council held a work session to discuss options for using money generated by the city’s TIF district, which sunsets in 2020. Cities use TIF districts as an economic development tool in which revenue gained from increased taxes within the district is funneled into a special fund. That money is reserved for specific projects that improve the district and hopefully encourage business growth there. Whitefish city officials expect the TIF district to generate more than $4 million per year through fiscal year 2020, the final year before the district expires. That puts the TIF fund on pace for an ending cash balance of $10.7 million when factoring in already dedicated expenditures.At the work session, councilors and staff discussed whether the high school would be an eligible project for TIF funds. The Whitefish school district has identified a new or updated school as a top priority. Much of the current facility is more than 50 years old, which school officials say presents a variety of concerns, including health and safety.After a lengthy planning process that included substantial public comment, a design team has presented a proposal that would combine renovations with new construction to modernize the high school. The price tag is $18.5-19.5 million and councilors would like to know if TIF funds can be used to help pay for that figure or any other proposed figure that may arise.During its Oct. 17 work session, the council looked at three primary options for allocating TIF funds for the high school. One is releasing revenue to all of the taxing jurisdictions that contribute to the fund. The city could also advance a certain amount of tax revenue that the school district is anticipated to receive from the city over the coming years. The city and school district have a unique interlocal agreement in which the district receives a share of residential tax increases. A third option, generally favored by the council, is adding the school to the TIF district. Stearns said the city is looking into the legal aspects of such a move, adding that “all options are still in play.”Stearns knows of examples in which cities have made direct TIF contributions to school districts in Montana, though they generally involve lower sums of money. When he was finance director in Missoula two decades ago, Stearns said the city made a contribution to the school district from the TIF fund to help pay for windows.“Direct grants have been made to schools in the past but the difference here is the amount of money,” Stearns said.He also cautioned against being too liberal with interpreting TIF laws. When the state Legislature convenes every two years, Stearns said TIF districts are often a topic of conversation, particularly if a legislator perceives that a certain municipality is misusing the funds.“When people stretch the boundaries, someone may or may not like that,” Stearns said. “Everyone has their own ideas of how tax increment funds should be used and sometimes those options differ.”Contributing funds to a new City Hall is more straightforward. When the city adopted its urban renewal plan in 1987, it was decided that TIF funds would fund a new City Hall to avoid issuing a bond or raising taxes. The current building was built in 1917 and the façade was refaced in 1958. City officials say there are size limitations and structural deficiencies in the building. Currently, the parks and recreation and building departments are housed in separate locations.Based on the resolutions of past city councils, Stearns said more than $1.5 million has been allocated so far for City Hall construction. Council has the power to overturn those resolutions if it wants to use the money elsewhere.Stearns has been meeting with Finance Director Rich Knapp and other involved parties such as the school district. He also points out that there is a list of other projects eligible for TIF funds.“We have to look at all of our options,” he said. Wendy Compton-Ring walks past the front entrance of Whitefish High School. Whitefish is considering using TIF funds to help pay for a new high school.last_img read more

American Legion Baseball Aims to Return This Weekend

first_imgIf all goes as planned, a Kalispell Lakers pitcher will nod at his catcher, take a deep, cleansing breath, rear back and snap local sports back to life on Saturday night.Baseball is on the verge of coming back, bringing with it both an escape from the coronavirus pandemic and a handful of glaring reminders that things are not back to normal just yet. Teams have been practicing for weeks with a hope that games could be just around the corner, and, barring an unexpected change in state or local regulations, the Lakers and the Whitefish-based Glacier Twins plan to open the 2020 season at Griffin Field at 7 p.m. on May 23.High school sports across Montana were abruptly ended in mid-March in response to the coronavirus pandemic, and the start of the legion baseball season was postponed earlier this spring. Hope for an amended schedule emerged in late April when Gov. Steve Bullock announced a phased reopening of the state, but that hope initially appeared to have been dashed on May 11 when the American Legion’s national organization announced it had “shut down all sponsorship and national involvement in baseball for the 2020 season.” Six days later, though, the Department of Montana American Legion Baseball was formed with the national office’s blessing, and a full season is starting to take shape.The decision by the national organization to walk away means there will be no regional or national tournaments this year, but otherwise local operations remain mostly unchanged. The insurance policies once coordinated at the national level were made available to individual clubs by the same carrier, and with the state now permitted to use the American Legion moniker there should be no visible differences in how teams are identified.There will be plenty of differences in the fan and player experience, however, as clubs follow the same phase one regulations that apply to businesses like gyms and restaurants. Stadiums will operate at 50% capacity, while teams will implement strict social distancing measures for fans. On the field, equipment will be regularly sanitized, players will be spaced out inside dugouts (and in some cases spread beyond the dugouts), team water jugs and seeds will be outlawed, umpires will be encouraged to wear face coverings and teams won’t shake hands before or after games.Schedules have also been altered. Montana teams typically play in a conference that includes clubs in Canada, and as long as the international border remains closed, those teams will not be a part of the league. Teams also regularly travel beyond state borders or welcome out-of-state opponents, and Montana’s 14-day quarantine for out-of-state travelers has nixed those games for the time being.Still, state chairman Ron Edwards said all of Montana’s clubs in Class AA, A and B are attempting to field teams in 2020, and the Lakers (AA, A and B), Twins (A, B) and Libby Loggers (A, B) all plan to field their full complement of teams. Edwards also said state tournaments in Class AA and A have been scheduled, with the AA tourney Aug. 5-9 in Helena and the Class A series Aug. 6-9 at a to-be-determined location.For now, the Lakers and Twins plan to play three times this weekend, Saturday and Monday in Kalispell and Sunday night in Whitefish, while the Loggers plan to begin their season against the Twins on May 27. But all three clubs understand that in the age of coronavirus, plans can change at any moment. The decision to play ultimately rests with local health departments, and the Flathead City-County Health Department had not given the final go-ahead to valley teams as of May 18, although Lakers Board of Directors President Toby Liechti said the health department has so far been “receptive” to his organization’s plans. And any future re-tightening of virus-related restrictions would almost certainly bring the season to a premature end.Regardless of what happens now or later this summer, Liechti said the last few weeks have offered everyone in the baseball community a reminder of seasons past.“Whatever this looks like, whatever happens, we’re going to take what we can get,” he said. “But the boys are ready to go.”[email protected] Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

Mc Ateer and Whelan convicted at Anglo trial

first_img Mc Ateer and Whelan convicted at Anglo trial Previous article56 vacant houses in Donegal to be restored under new government schemeNext articleMan in his 40s dies in Tyrone crash News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Facebook Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Pinterest Former Anglo Irish Bank directors Willie McAteer and Pat Whelan have been convicted of providing illegal loans to the Maple ten to prop up the bank’s share price.The two former Anglo executives have been remanded on bail for a sentencing hearing on April 28th.There was no visible reaction from Pat Whelan and Willie McAteer as the jury found them guilty of providing illegal loans to ten wealthy Anglo Irish Bank customers back in July 2008.The unanimous verdicts came after nearly 17 hours of deliberations over 5 daysHowever the two men were acquitted on a further 6 charges of providing unlawful financial assistance to the family of Cavan businessman Sean Quinn.The purpose of the 16 loans was to unwind Mr Quinn’s 29% secret stake in anglo over concerns it was destabilising the bank’s share price.However the terms of the loans to the Quinns and the Maple Ten were different  the Maple customers essentially got a better deal which made the lending ‘uncommercial’ according to a banking expert …and not in the ordinary course of banking as the accused had claimed.The bank’s Sean Fitzpatrick was unaware of the conditions of the lending to the Maple Ten  which explains his acquittal by the jury last night.Under the companies acts his two former colleagues face a maximum penalty of up to 5 years in prison.They made no comment as they walked from the criminal courts of justice Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Twitter Google+ Google+center_img LUH still not ready to restore IT systems Pinterest By News Highland – April 17, 2014 WhatsApp WhatsApp Pregnant women can receive Covid vaccine at LYIT’s vaccination centre News Twitter Lárionad Acmhainní Nádúrtha CTR to take part in new research project Facebooklast_img read more