Build Cross-Platform Widgets in the Cloud with Netvibes Studio

first_imgeXo released its hosted IDE earlier this year. Its features include versioning, Java validation and REST service discovery.Netvibes shifted from being a consumer-centric RSS dashboard to building enterprise dashboards a couple years ago. Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… klint finley Related Posts IT + Project Management: A Love Affair 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Tags:#enterprise#saas Dashboard software-as-a-service provider Netvibes and enterprise Java platform builder eXo have teamed up to create Netvibes Studio, a cloud-based development environment for building cross-platform widgets. Widgets built with Netvibes Studio can run in any browser, and can be deployed instantly into the Netvibes environment. Better yet, they will work in most major widget platforms, including iGoogle, Windows Vista, Apple Dashboard, Live.com, iPhone, Opera and more.last_img read more

The High Stakes Game of Health Data Analytics

first_imgPaid content supplied by John LynnWe’ve all had the experience where our smart phone or a consumer email list sends us an alert “customized to our preferences” that misses the mark. Experiences like these and many others teach us that we should be careful about how we use and trust data since the data could be wrong. That’s an extremely important lesson for healthcare as we enter a new world of healthcare reimbursement where what we get paid will largely be driven by data.  Done correctly, healthcare will lower costs, improve care, and better serve even the most vulnerable patients on the back of high quality data analytics. Done incorrectly, healthcare will treat the wrong patients, increase costs and miss helping the patients that need healthcare the most.  This is the high stakes game of health data analytics.Healthcare is currently being engulfed by data from every angle.  While this is extremely challenging, we’re seeing examples of successfully using the data to improve healthcare. For example, one university medical center used predictive analytics developed from a dataset of over 250,000 patient admissions to create an early warning system which can identify high-risk hospital ward patients and improve ICU triage decisions as much as 48 hours in advance. This is why healthcare data analytics is so important and essential to the future of healthcare.  The right data analytics at the right place at the right time is going to save lives and money.Stan Huff, CMIO at Intermountain, likes to share an experienceOpens in a new window they had in their hospital. When evaluating different treatments for patients at their hospital they found that one treatment would cause problems in 4 in 100 patients while an alternate treatment would only cause problems in 3 in 100 patients.  It turns out that the human mind can’t comprehend a difference in quality of 4 in 100 versus 3 in 100. However, computers can tell that difference.  This is the heart of health data analytics and illustrates why we need appropriately research health data analytics to assist in care.The challenge is that there are thousands of treatments, protocols, approaches, analytics, etc that need to be tested and evaluated for their efficacy. No one organization will be able to evaluate every healthcare analytic out there. We’re going to need to create a way to share health data analytics findings across organizations so that everyone benefits.We’re starting to see this type of sharing happening between healthcare organizations. Some organizations are doing it in an open source manner on the back of the FHIR protocol where any organization can take their work and implement it in their organization. Others are creating commercial platforms where a healthcare organization’s research can be commercialized and shared with other organizations. Both models can work, but we need hundreds and thousands of more organizations and people involved in this health data research and sharing if we really want to extract all of the benefits health data analytics can provide.  While cognitive computing and neural networks is showing promise, we still need humans to assist in the process.What’s particularly interesting about this high stakes “game” of healthcare data analytics is that those that are most successful are going to define what the future of healthcare will look like. Health data scientists’ analytics discoveries are going to create a standard of care that will be required of every healthcare organization.  It could literally be considered malpractice for someone to practice medicine contrary to what the health data says about a patient. Sure, there will be exceptions to the data analytic, but there will have to be some strong mitigating reasons to ignore the analytics and proceed down a different care path.The beauty of health data analytics is that we have a tremendous opportunity to improve care and lower healthcare costs. The scary part of health data analytics is that we could get it wrong and patients could lose their lives.last_img read more

World’s first ‘bionic bra’ adjusts to breast movement

first_imgPicture for representational purposeScientists have designed the world’s first ‘bionic bra’ that automatically adjusts itself in response to the breast movement to provide more comfort to the wearer.Researchers from the University of Wollongong in Australia have created a new prototype of the bra, made using intelligent components.”The advent of approaches such as 3D printing has enabled us to assemble structures containing new sensing technologies to more accurately monitor movement and new artificial muscle technologies to control it,” Professor Gordon Wallace, Executive Research Director of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science at UOW said.”These advances have inspired us to (re)confront the challenges involved in creating the Bionic Bra,” Wallace said.Professor Julie Steele, Director of Breast Research Australia (BRA) based at UOW, has been investigating the movement of women’s breast during physical activity for more than 15 years.She said without the right breast support, long-term damage can be done, including numbness in the fingers caused by compression of nerves on the shoulders, as well as neck and back pain.”Unfortunately, the most supportive sports bras tend to be the most uncomfortable to wear. Making matters worse, BRA research has found that 85 per cent of women are wearing bras that do not fit or support their breasts correctly,” said Wallace.While vast improvements have been made recently to the design of the Bionic Bra, the researchers said there are still some kinks to iron out.”Although we have made substantial progress, we still have a way to go before the Bionic Bra can be taken from the bench top to the washing machine. However, when finished, the Bionic Bra will transform bra design,” Steele said.advertisement”Results indicate that our technologies can sense breast motion and provide additional breast support. The challenge now is to integrate these technologies into a functional, comfortable bra,” Bionic Bra team member Dr Sheridan Gho said.last_img read more

The People Tracking Every Touch Pass And Tackle in the World Cup

With each click and drag of a mouse, young soccer fanatics are creating the building blocks of the advanced stats that are changing how the sport is played, watched and analyzed.Opta and Prozone are among the companies that have taken soccer stats far beyond goals and saves, into the realm of pass completion percentage, defensive touches, percentage of aerial balls won, tackle percentage and goals scored above expectation. Cameras alone can’t process all these stats. So companies employ people — mostly young, mostly male, most logging matches in their spare time as a second job — to watch matches and document every event.Their work has helped develop stats that capture the value of players who don’t score many goals, but who set them up with pinpoint passing and hustle. Teams use advanced stats to decide which players to buy and put on the pitch. And fans, whether they like it or not, read and hear more numbers than ever before about this sport that for so long bucked the sports-analytics trend.On a Sunday last month, Opta1Opta Sports provides soccer stats to ESPN, which owns FiveThirtyEight. Opta also provides stats for other sports, including cricket, rugby and motor sports. Last year, Opta was bought for 40 million pounds ($67 million) by Perform Group. let me watch as the loggers at its South London headquarters tracked the last 10 matches of England’s Premier League season. I stood among rows of young men at computer monitors as they scrutinized games, sometimes rewinding on one monitor to check a tough call while keeping track of the live feed on another. I tried to stay out of the way while their supervisor leapt away from watching his favorite team’s match to confirm every goal was attributed correctly. And I watched as Opta’s media team processed the raw numbers — 1,600 to 2,000 events per game — into TV-ready factoids, which they heard commentators repeat to TV audiences moments later.In soccer stats, as in so many other numbers-gathering endeavors, big data sets are built piece by piece by human collectors with human imperfections, moods and preferences. Throughout the year, 350 part-time analysts working in London and a half-dozen other Opta branches in Europe and North and South America record every pass, header and goal while watching live or recorded video of more than 14,000 matches around the world. The London operation I watched will be logging each of the World Cup’s 64 matches.Opta says software, standards and oversight can help it harness the best of human judgment while curbing any potential downsides. It sees the people behind its stats as a selling point. I wasn’t the first to be invited to watch. Many prospective customers visit during matches, said Aidan Cooney, chief executive of Opta. “Frankly, that sells the business.”The business is providing stats to professional clubs, to national teams, to leagues — as the official data provider for the top divisions in England, Spain and Germany — and to the media.A Tebow jersey and a Yankees capMy day at Opta was an unusually busy one: Every Premier League club was playing its last match of the season. The finale wasn’t as exciting as 2012’s: Manchester City was all but assured of edging Liverpool for the title, and most Champions League and Europa League slots had been sewn up. The biggest suspense was whether Tottenham would finish in sixth or seventh in the league.That was the case, anyway, for Paul Pettitt, 31, who is the assistant manager of data collection and a Tottenham Hotspur supporter. He spent the two hours between kickoff and final whistle alternately tracking Tottenham’s match against Aston Villa — when Tottenham took an early lead, he said he wanted a 25-goal win to contend for fifth place on goal differential — and jumping out of his chair to check on calls in other games, such as whether an early Swansea goal was a deflection. All logged events scrolled down a screen at his station, and when an important one came up, he conferred with the analyst who entered it.This is when soccer’s rare stoppages of play are so valuable for analysts. A lengthy goal celebration allows loggers to rewind and rewatch goals and other major events, often while Pettitt looks on.But most of the work is logging routine passes. Opta’s analysts log each one by dragging and clicking a mouse at the spot where the pass was received, then keying in the player who received it. Their monitors have an image of a soccer pitch in the background with video of the live match superimposed on top.Confusingly, to my eyes, the broadcast image hardly ever corresponded to the image on the field. So loggers had to drag the mouse to a spot that had nothing to do with the ball’s location in the video rectangle. None of the loggers I watched got stuck on this point: After all, this was the 38th and last match of the season.Each of the 10 matches had a pair of analysts assigned to it, plus a checker. Each analyst had his own monitor and tracked only one team’s touches. Sometimes the analysts conferred over calls — “Is it a tackle?” was a question in the fourth minute of the Liverpool match. (It wasn’t.)Until eight years ago, Opta didn’t even produce the live numbers that are now such a staple of TV broadcasts. Pettitt started at Opta in 2001, fortunately just as the company was phasing out pen-and-paper logging. He wasn’t lucky enough to miss the VCR era. “My elbow started aching after a while” from all the rewinding, he recalled.The more unusual a team’s formation, the harder it is to log its matches. A well-organized side like Barcelona can be easy to log, Khalid Hussain, U.K. training manager for Opta, said. Today he particularly enjoys challenging matches.At his peak, Hussain was logging 10 to 15 matches a week during each Premier League season. His primary assignment was Arsenal, and he also worked four nights a week covering matches around the world. He once logged six matches in a day. “Then I went home at the end, in a pretty bad state,” he said.All this meticulous work changed how Hussain, now 33, watches soccer. He became “very passionate” about Arsenal, to the point where he’d enjoy watching a Gunners match against Stoke more than Real Madrid versus Barcelona, a minority opinion in global soccer. When he clicked a name at one end of the pitch and then entered the same name at the other end seconds later, he came to appreciate the players who covered a lot of territory more than the flashy dribblers.And he learned that his previous pet stat of possession time doesn’t mean much. “Working here burst that bubble,” Hussain said. “It doesn’t matter how much ball you’ve got. You’ve still got to do something with it.”Hussain is mainly a supervisor now, though he pitches in as an analyst when needed. On this day, he logged Cagliari for its 1-0 loss to Chievo.2Opta didn’t make available for an interview any of its more junior analysts who were working the Premier League matches. Like other pinch-hitters who aren’t familiar with their assigned clubs’ players and formations, Hussain watched DVDs of recent Cagliari matches to prepare.The loggers Hussain supervises generally are between 18 and 24 years old and male. (“We’ve got two girls in Leeds, and one girl in Germany,” he said.) They love sports. They enter an office fantasy NFL league. They go home and play video games. They day I watched, none wore soccer apparel but I spotted a Tim Tebow jersey and a Yankees cap.It helps to be nuts about soccer, to appreciate “a job where they get to come in and watch football,” as Pettitt put it.There is occasionally cheering in the analysts’ box. “As much as you can try to control them, if Liverpool score a goal while Man City are down a goal, you might hear a yelp from our Liverpool fan, and probably some censored words as well,” Pettitt said.Candidates are tested for their understanding of soccer and their hand-eye coordination when using the Opta logging software. They have to type quickly with their left hands, without looking at the keyboard. Certified soccer coaches sometimes don’t have the required hand-eye coordination; the avid PlayStation players often do. “We give them five-hour tests, and pick out the ones who are best,” Hussain said.At that stage, successful applicants remain far from match-ready. It will be at least a month before they’ll produce usable data, even under the easiest conditions of logging a recorded match. “For training, they do the same game over and over for two or three days,” Hussain said.Cooney, the Opta chief executive, has tried his hand at logging, “much to everyone’s amusement,” he said. “It’s impossible, absolutely impossible for someone of my motor skill set,” he added. “If you don’t play PlayStation, basically, you’re finished.”Opta employs full-time analysts to review every event of the matches it logs, a process that can take three to five hours. Its live analysts get 99 percent of player identifications correct, Pettitt said.The match-trackers are rated on their performance, and the best get spare games.3Opta doesn’t disclose how much it pays analysts. It creates a competition, and “keeps them on their toes,” Hussain said. He’s confident that today he’s one of the best loggers in London. He also gets to travel to train loggers at offices around Europe.The dubious goals panelAmong Opta’s competitors is Prozone Sports, which tracks players on the pitch using cameras and player-recognition systems. Stewart Mairs, the U.S. operations manager for Prozone, said the company’s optical tracking system — like SportsVU’s for the NBA — gives it a leg up over Opta. The system produces millions of data points per game.Prozone, like Opta, needs human loggers, too. Prozone’s cameras sometimes can’t tell players apart when they cluster, and don’t distinguish crucial game events. So it employs coders, usually interns or students who are interested in soccer, Mairs said. Like at Opta, they are supervised and trained by more experienced managers, and, for big matches, supplemented by more experienced coders.Cooney said Opta is offering something different from camera tracking. “People want analytics,” he said. “That requires holistic data sets, which only we can deliver.”Keeping standards consistent across offices is vital for Opta. An assist needs to mean the same thing in London, New York and Montevideo. Soccer stats already have plenty of doubters, and it doesn’t help that different companies track different numbers. Also, individual companies sometimes change what they track, as Opta does nearly every year after an annual review. (Possibly coming soon: more detail on fouls.)So it’s all the more important that a company’s data can be trusted across space and time. “What we’ve had as a clearance” — a defender clearing a ball out of the goal area — “has always been the same, and will not change,” Pettitt said.In addition to post-match reviews, Opta monitors stats across leagues, to make sure they don’t vary too much — and if they do, that it’s because of style of play and not analyst inconsistency.Opta also updates its stats according to decisions of a Premier League group called the dubious goals panel, which weighs whether a player should be awarded a goal when, say, the shot deflected off a defender.Close calls mean the live data is provisional. It’s good enough for television broadcasters, who pepper Opta’s media team with questions via instant message during the matches. I wandered over to watch the media group in action during play. They sat next to a wall with six television screens, usually more than enough but four short of the required number on this day. So laptops filled the gap.During play, the media team moved quickly. Liverpool’s Martin Skrtel scored an own goal in the 20th minute. Duncan Alexander, 36, head of U.K. content and customer services for Opta, told his colleague to “run it” —  in other words, to check that Skrtel had just set the league record for most own goals in a season, with four. The stat was confirmed, sent to the broadcasting company Sky, and announced by studio host Jeff Stelling right after the commercial break.Later, Stelling mentioned that Fulham had used 38 players this season, a new record. I asked if that was from Opta. Alexander nodded.These sorts of stats are nice to have, but won’t change the way managers set their lineups or choose tactics. However, the work of Opta and its ilk have brought soccer, very slowly, into the wider statistical revolution in sports. Alexander and Pettitt pointed to the increasing prominence of assists. A decade ago, “some people would refuse to give assists credence,” Alexander said.Opta’s soccer-stats professionals acknowledge their numbers aren’t for everyone. “There will always be fans who, to use a phrase we hear occasionally, say the only stat they care about is the one in the top left-hand corner” — the score, Alexander said. “We’re not zealots. We don’t bang the drum saying, you have to view football the way we do.” read more

Dear Lionel Messi Please Please Dont Quit Argentina

To: Lionel Andres MessiFrom: Benjamin Morris, professional skeptic, sports researcher and Messi obsessiveDear Mr. Messi,Over the past half dozen years, you have been far and away the best player in the world’s most popular sport, but we know you’ve been having a bit of a rough time of late. You’ve been dealing with tax evasion charges. You’ve dealt with injuries, and fallen to third in scoring in La Liga. Your club team Barcelona was unable to repeat last year’s amazing treble after being knocked out of the UEFA Champions League in the quarterfinals.And finally, following Argentina’s loss against Chile in the Copa America final – in which you missed a kick that may have been the difference in a penalty shootout – you seemed to indicate an inclination to retire from the Argentine national team:It was the thing I wanted the most, but I couldn’t get it, so I think it’s over. I think this is best for everyone. First of all for me, then for everyone. . . . It’s very hard, but the decision is taken. Now I will not try more and there will be no going back.We’re not entirely sure what you meant by this, and I hope by the time this letter reaches you, you’ll have relented. But, just in case: Retiring is a terrible idea.Of course you don’t owe anyone anything, and you can do what you want. But here’s why you shouldn’t:You missed a damn free throw.Look, you screwed up. You missed a penalty kick that would have put Argentina ahead, and your team ended up losing. You also failed to put the ball on frame – thus violating the first rule of penalty kicking.But let’s dispel the myth that penalty kicks are easy. In the top divisions of soccer (the Big Five leagues and major international tournaments) about 75 percent of the penalty kicks taken connect – similar to the rate at which free throws are made the NBA (76 percent in 2015-16). But even this partly masks their difficulty, as penalty kicks are generally taken by the designated (and typically best) penalty kicker on each team.You’ve made about 78 percent of your penalty kicks, for both club and country. This is below the rate of some other top strikers like Cristiano Ronaldo and Zlatan Ibrahimovic (who have made around 85 percent each), but is above average overall. For comparison, LeBron James has made around 74 percent of his free throws in his career (below average in the NBA) — and just made 72 percent against the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals.High-leverage misses are painful — had LeBron missed his second straight free throw in the waning seconds of Game 7 and the Warriors tied the game, it would have been a disaster, percentages be damned. But percentages win out in the long run nonetheless, and following this miss, you’ve now made three of your four shootout shots for Argentina, perfectly in line with your career penalty kick conversion rate.International play may not be as pretty, but you’re still the best at itAnother persistent myth in soccer is that you haven’t been as good for Argentina in international play as you’ve been for Barcelona in club play. While it’s true that the numbers you’ve put up at Barcelona have been mind-boggling, you’ve also played brilliantly for Argentina. To see just how much so, let’s look at some very basic stats: Goals plus assists per game played, for both club and country (excluding international friendlies). Here’s what we have according to ESPN Stats & Info data (which includes data from most club and some international results back to 2010-11, and from World Cups back to 1966): Your play for Argentina has been the third-most productive on a game-by-game basis (0.88 GPA/G over 42 games). Of the 324 soccer players with at least 20 appearances for both (Big Five) club and country, only two have put together more productive runs: David Villa, with 0.90 GPA/G over 31 games for Spain and Klass-Jan Huntelaar with 0.96 GPA/G over 29 games for the Netherlands. (In fact, despite international soccer being notoriously low-scoring, the international version of yourself has been more productive than any club players save yourself, Ronaldo, Ibrahimovic and Luis Suarez.)As great as Villa and Huntelaar have been, they’re basically the result of the field playing playing “best hand” against you. How well have their international hot streaks have been corroborated by their club careers? In the Stats & Info data, Villa scored 0.49 goals plus assists per game in club play, and Huntelaar scored 0.61. You’ve scored 1.46. In other words, their combined club production still falls well short of yours.Your play with Argentina does affect your legacy. It cements it.But let’s face it: In Barcelona, you pretty much play for an all-star team in a game so unequal it makes Major League Baseball look like a communist revolution. You play for a team so good that you aren’t even the most productive player on it! I mean, you’re likely still more valuable, but Luis Suarez has had a Messi-like season.Playing for Argentina is your one chance to play a substantial number of games on a relatively even playing field.Of course, other players benefit from playing for what are essentially all-star teams as well, but on the other side: While Argentina is a decent team on its own, without you it doesn’t have the star power as Germany, Brazil, Spain or the Netherlands. Many players have been significantly more productive playing for their international team than their club team, and vice versa. We don’t always know which represents a player’s true strength, so let’s look at the less productive setting of the two for everyone: You come out on top, even though some players have fewer games and higher variance (the three other dots in your neighborhood are – you guessed it – Ronaldo, Ibrahimovic and Suarez). Of the players who have done worse for club than country, only Neymar and Robin Van Persie have produced within 0.1 GPA/G of the 0.88 you put up for Argentina.If you take an unweighted average of country and club performance, your 1.17 GPA/G easily tops all players, with Ronaldo second at 1.08 and Ibrahimovic in third at 0.96.Still not convinced? Here are a few hundred million other reasons to keep playing.So you’ve never won a major cup for Argentina. Continuing to play is no guarantee that you will. And no matter what you do, some Argentinians will never think you’re better than Maradona. International play is hard and high variance.But it’s also incredibly popular.You’ll be turning 31 at the start of the 2018 World Cup, meaning you could legitimately have two or three more runs on the grandest stage in sports left in you.Of the hundreds of millions of soccer fans who have seen you play, most have seen you in the blue and white.1Note your most famous fan isn’t wearing creamsicle. I think I can safely speak for all of us when I say that we appreciate seeing your magic on the international stage, even if it’s a long, frustrating and potentially futile struggle. read more

Football Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer to receive contract extension through

Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer speaks to the media on Dec. 28 prior to the 2017 Cotton Bowl in Dallas, Texas. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorUrban Meyer has spent the past six seasons as Ohio State’s head coach and the university plans to have him lead the Buckeyes at least five more seasons.With Meyer’s contract set to expire in three years, Athletic Director Gene Smith sat down with the coach after the Cotton Bowl and discussed an extension. At a press conference Wednesday morning, Smith said Ohio State will add two seasons to Meyer’s contract to extend it through the 2022-23 season, when Meyer will be 58 years old. Smith did not specify how much Meyer would make with the extension. “We’re going to sign an extension here soon because the university has been good enough to extend something to me,” Meyer said.Smith made a recommendation to President Michael Drake that Meyer’s contract be extended, a motion Drake supported for Smith to pursue. Smith will present the Board with the extension in April.Smith said it is typical for coaches to receive extensions once their contracts have three or less years remaining, regardless of the sport.“But once we got south of that four years, it’s typical, I don’t care where you are, for that issue to come up about ‘He’s not going to be there when [a recruit is] a senior,’” Smith said. “It’s simple. That’s the way it’s always been. So yes, when that came up, I knew it was going to come up, it was just a matter of getting it done.”Smith said Meyer needed the extension so his remaining years are not used against him on the recruiting trail. Five-star offensive tackle prospect and Clemson signee Jackson Carman said Tiger head coach Dabo Swinney said Meyer is on the back end of his career.“He’s got three years left and it probably hurts in recruiting, so we need to sit and I brought it to him and said, ‘Hey, we need to talk about an extension in order to alleviate some of those concerns,” Smith said. “I know how healthy he is, how excited he is to be here. So, we just need to deal with that.”Meyer made $6.4 million in base salary last season. Smith said Meyer’s extension will not be in the range of Alabama’s Nick Saban, who made $11,132,000 last season, and Jimbo Fisher, who signed a 10-year, $75-million contract with Texas A&M. At a Board of Trustees’ Talent and Compensation meeting on Thursday, Smith called Alabama’s coaching salaries a “reactionary type of management” and said Fisher’s contract is “so ridiculous.” He also said he disregards outliers, such as Saban’s and Fisher’s contracts because they are outliers. On Wednesday, he said he did not believe in 10-year contracts.Meyer has compiled a 73-9 record in his six seasons as Ohio State’s head coach. The Buckeyes went 12-2 last year and finished the season with a victory against USC in the Cotton Bowl. read more

Zola agent says no talks with Chelsea yet

first_imgIt appears like Fulvio Marrucco who is Gianfranco Zola’s agent has become frustrated by Chelsea for their protracted pursuit of Maurizio Sarri.The former Blues striker is believed to take a role with Sarri, either as his assistant or as an intermediary with the club and the squad. However, the Coach is still on a contract deal with the Partenopei, and no compensation package has been agreed so far.“We need to find an agreement between Sarri and Napoli,” Fulvio Marrucco pointed out on Radio Crc via Football Italia.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“It’s a negotiation which hasn’t taken off, I’ve heard ‘tomorrow will be the right day’ so many times, but too many tomorrows have passed.“Zola has no agreements with Chelsea. At the moment we’re waiting for Sarri, for a resolution with [Antonio] Conte, for an agreement between Chelsea and Napoli and also an agreement between Sarri and the London club.“If all that happens, Zola and Sarri can talk about an eventual collaboration. Zola hasn’t had any contact, nor have I ever gone to London.”last_img read more

City star compares Peps coaching to parental teaching

first_imgManchester City midfielder Fernandinho has compared the coaching of the club’s manager, Pep Guardiola to the education of a parent.Fernandinho joined City from Shakhtar Donetsk in 2013, the same summer that the Citizens appointed Manuel Pellegrini as manager. But it’s under the tutelage of Guardiola that the Brazilian and his team-mates have improved on the pitch.“The synchronization has to be precise. Everyone knows their role and what they have to do on the pitch,” explains Fernandinho, according to Daily Mail.“Some players didn’t understand what he wanted in that first year, everyone was learning. Now, it only takes a gesture from him. It has become easier.“When you are a father talking to your son or daughter for the first time, they don’t understand you. You have patience because you are a father and keep talking to them and eventually they do understand.jose mourinhoMourinho knows why City and Liverpool are so far ahead George Patchias – September 13, 2019 Jose Mourinho knows why Manchester City and Liverpool are so far ahead of everyone else in the Premier League.In an interview with the Telegraph,…Fernandinho is the oldest member of Guardiola’s team and will be taking part in his 11th Manchester Derby, when City host United on Sunday.“Of course it hurt we lost, we had the chance to win the title against our biggest opponent, and we missed it,” he admits.“We didn’t treat it like a party. In other games we also took our kids on the pitch, we didn’t do anything different.“What happened is that we scored two goals and missed a lot of chances. United came back well to win and that can happen in football with good teams.“We cannot think about that now. I don’t think you should talk about revenge. We have to be very careful with United.”last_img read more

CWCLIME gets exclusive rights to sports TV

first_img LIME Announces Flat Rate Plan Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:Cable and Wireless Communications PLC, Flow Sports, lime tci, Premier League Football Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 12 Oct 2015 – A more assertive maneuver to beef up its sports offerings is coming from Cable and Wireless thanks to a new partnership.Football lovers will now be able to enjoy action from the Premier League Football games exclusively through Cable and Wireless Communications PLC on the Caribbean’s newest sports network: Flow Sports. LIME TCI revealed that the option includes the showing of all 380 matches per season of the Premier league across 32 Caribbean countries from 2016 to 2019. The company, also won the mobile clip rights which will allows customers to view the games on any mobile device. A press release stated, “The network will be launched in November 2015, with content that includes coverage of international and regional football, cricket, rugby, tennis and athletics, as well as CWC’s exclusive NFL and Rio 2016 Olympics coverage. Flow Sports will broadcast across the region from a new 4-K-ready, state-of-the-art facility in Trinidad, offering 24/7 sports coverage in HD.”John Reid, President of CWC’s Consumer Division said: “We are thrilled to partner with the Premier League across the Caribbean.”Phil Bentley, Chief Executive of Cable & Wireless Communications said: “Following our merger with Columbus and our re-branding to Flow, the agreement with the Premier League is yet another example of the growing momentum building across the Caribbean…” The Indian Premier League Has a New Home in the Caribbean Flow Sports now offers an unrivalled Cricket line-up Recommended for you FISH FRY CANCELLED; GUESTS DISAPPOINTED AND HOTELLIER IS FURIOUSlast_img read more