Internet of Things (IoT) and Manufacturing: Sensor Technology will be the Enabler of IoT in Manufacturing

first_imgThe IoT market is big and growing rapidly.  A report from Credence Research estimates that the global IoT market was worth $690 billion in 2015 and that it will grow each of the next seven years by an average of nearly 16 percent.  Gartner estimates that this year we will have 6.4 billion ‘things’ already connected, up 30 percent from last year.One area that is ripe for the deployment of IoT technology is manufacturing.  To date, adoption in the manufacturing sector has been relatively low.  The potential is that equipment on the factory floor can be equipped with sensors, and the collected sensor data can then be fed back into both control and business decision systems.  GE, for example, focuses on the term IoT relative to a manufacturing and industrial setting and calls it the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).A survey by BI Intelligence found that 96 percent of executives from companies of greater than $1 billion in size thought that industrial IoT will be critical for their business success.  60 percent of executives thought that IIoT is having a big impact on their operations.Iain Gillott, president and founder of iGR, said that “several key drivers, such as decreased costs and increased throughput and yields, may prompt more manufacturers to deploy IoT solutions.  Therefore, over the next five years, expect a growing number of wireless IoT sensors to be used by the manufacturing industry.”last_img read more

This amazing blue tarantula is a new spider species—but did researchers break the law when they studied it?

first_img By Yao-Hua LawFeb. 27, 2019 , 12:00 PM Chien Lee This amazing blue tarantula is a new spider species—but did researchers break the law when they studied it? A spectacular spider is new to science. A female of the world’s most recently named tarantula species has electric-blue legs and a creamy toffee body. She’s native to the state of Sarawak in Malaysia and would fit nicely in your palm. Spider fanciers were thrilled when the new species came to light. But its emergence also highlights a growing illegal trade in tarantulas and researchers’ laissez-faire attitudes about dubious specimens.The spider was described in the February issue of The Journal of the British Tarantula Society by arachnologists Ray Gabriel and Danniella Sherwood, who list their affiliation as the Hope Entomological Collection, Oxford University Museum of Natural History in the United Kingdom. They classified the spider as a new species in a new genus and named it Birupes simoroxigorum. Its genus name stems from biru, the Malay word for blue; simoroxigorum incorporates names of the children (Simon, Roxanne, and Igor) of the three European collectors who provided the specimens. They captured the animals in the forests of Sarawak and transported them to Europe. But the Forest Department of Sarawak says they lacked permits to collect or export wildlife.”This case reflects the all-too-prevalent bio-piracy in Malaysia,” says Chien Lee, a naturalist and photographer in Sarawak. With Lars Fehlandt, a German photographer, Lee found the tarantula in September 2017, about 6 weeks before the collectors did, and posted photographs online.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Sherwood says she and her co-author “had no reason to believe” that the specimens were illegal. They received two dead spiders from the collectors “in good faith, meaning that we were told they were legally collected with all appropriate paperwork needed,” she wrote in an email. Science requested that Sherwood provide records of those permits, but she did not respond. Gabriel did not respond to requests for comment.The collectors, Krzysztof Juchniewicz, Emil Piorun, and Jakub Skowronek—based in Poland and the United Kingdom—find, breed, and sell tarantulas. Juchniewicz concedes they had no permit for collection, saying he didn’t know they needed one. But he insists they didn’t smuggle the tarantulas out of Malaysia, saying their driver mailed the spiders to Europe. “I’ve got all the necessary documents” for legal import, he says. “We didn’t do anything wrong.” (The other two collectors didn’t respond to requests for comment.)Science reconstructed their expedition to Sarawak in October and November 2017 from the collectors’ public Facebook posts, online chats with Juchniewicz provided by Fehlandt, and an interview with Juchniewicz. The three had been planning the trip for months. But they likely found out about what would make a prize catch just a few weeks earlier, on 14 September 2017, when Lee and Fehlandt posted their photos. The photographers named a nearby city as the vicinity of the sighting—a decision Lee now regrets.After the collectors trekked many kilometers over “plenty of nights” in “every type of jungle,” they triumphantly announced on Facebook that they found their target on the night of 2 November 2017. In photos, each of the three men gingerly holds the then-unnamed B. simoroxigorum. (The photos were removed after this article was published.)Sometime after their return to Europe, Juchniewicz, Piorun, and Skowronek passed two dead specimens to Gabriel and Sherwood for identification. When the arachnologists announced the tarantula qualified as a new genus and species, Juchniewicz posted the news on his store’s Facebook page, saying his greatest dream had come true.Piorun and Skowronek are now advertising the species for sale through their online stores, asking for more than $300 for a juvenile. Peter Kirk, chairman of the British Tarantula Society in London, says he saw B. simoroxigorum spiderlings labeled as captive-bred at an exposition in the United Kingdom just a few weeks ago.But Juchniewicz, who is based in Dewsbury, U.K., and is not selling the species, says there are no captive-bred B. simoroxigorum spiders on the market. The two animals he and the other collectors took in Sarawak died without breeding, he says. All B. simoroxigorum on the market have been caught in the wild and smuggled in “very, very big amounts” by others, he says.”Illegal tarantula collecting is a burgeoning problem worldwide,” says tarantula expert Rick West of Sooke, Canada. Collectors are meeting demand for “prettier, rarer, nastier, larger” spiders. Illegal collectors have long favored Brazil and Mexico, he says, but have begun to shift their hunts to Southeast Asia.Engkamat Lading, deputy controller of Wildlife Sarawak, says his powers to prevent illegal trade stop at the border. Although collecting nonprotected wildlife without a permit in Sarawak is punishable with a year in prison, he says, “how to get hold of [the collectors]? They have left Sarawak.” He hopes to get the three collectors banned from re-entering Sarawak.Joseph Koh, an arachnologist at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum in Singapore and author of several guides on spiders in Southeast Asia, says collectors sometimes dig up tarantula nests and destroy the arachnids’ sites. “As such spiders are rare to begin with,” Koh says, “wiping out their few remaining habitats, and destroying or capturing the juveniles, will definitely threaten the survival of such vulnerable species.”In the United States and Canada, it is a crime to violate the wildlife laws of another country, but no EU country forbids it, says Ernie Cooper, a wildlife trade specialist in Vancouver, Canada, and a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature Spider and Scorpion Specialist Group. As a result, Cooper says, “The primary market for illegally collected or traded tarantulas is the EU.” Those spiders can then easily be exported to North America, Pedro Cardoso and Caroline Fukushima, biologists at the University of Helsinki who study illegal trade in tarantulas and scorpions, wrote in an email.The arachnologists, however, may have broken U.K. laws. In signatory countries of the Nagoya Protocol, including the United Kingdom, taxonomists must ensure that specimens they study are legal. Darren Mann, head of zoology at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, tells Science that the arachnologists who worked on the new tarantula are not staff members and that the museum won’t house specimens collected illegally. Ray Hale, the British Tarantula Society’s vice-chairman and an arachnologist in Sussex, adds that Gabriel and Sherwood “have been naïve in the extreme” about the sources of the specimens they examined.Charles Leh, who retired in 2018 after 35 years as a curator at the Sarawak Museum, appreciates foreign taxonomists’ contributions because there is little local interest. But he contends that Gabriel and Sherwood should have been more cautious and not used poached specimens.Conservation of tarantulas and other spiders gets little attention from governments or advocacy groups, Cooper says. “Increased awareness of the problem might open up new opportunities” to address illegal tarantula trade, he says.With reporting by Erik Stokstad.last_img read more

Misbah-ul-Haq bemoans bowling flaws in Pakistan’s series loss

first_imgPakistan’s failure to take 20 wickets in all three Tests was responsible for their series loss in Australia and the situation will not improve unless players get more exposure to conditions Down Under, captain Misbah-ul-Haq said on Saturday. (Scorecard)Misbah’s team arrived in Australia with their hosts in disarray after a 2-1 home series loss to South Africa and the tourists were confident they could at least take one test in the series, if not emulate the Proteas.Despite the odd patch of competitiveness, Pakistan were largely outclassed and their demise was completed at the Sydney Cricket Ground on Saturday when they crumbled to a 220-run defeat to lose the series 3-0.”Our bowling is always our strength but in this series I was a bit disappointed that we couldn’t take 20 wickets in any of the Tests,” the 42-year-old Misbah told reporters.”That’s why we were so behind in every game, that’s important for you in Australian conditions. (Finch, Bailey dropped from Australia ODI squad, Lynn gets maiden call up)”It’s difficult for any Asian side to come here and take 20 wickets in a Test match. That’s an art and we could not do that and that mainly cost us the series.”If most of the Pakistan tour highlights came from batsman, the biggest disappointment was probably leg-spinner Yasir Shah, who arrived on his first tour Down Under with a big reputation but departed with eight wickets at a cost of 672 runs.He was not the first vaunted spinner from South Asia to struggle to adapt to the conditions.advertisementALIEN CONDITIONSSaturday’s defeat was Pakistan’s 12th straight in Australia through four series sweeps since 1999 and Misbah said youngsters identified as Test prospects had to be given a chance to taste the conditions earlier in their careers.”If we are not touring more often in Australia and South Africa, this could happen again and again,” he said.”I’ve already suggested that some of our players should be sent to Australia on a regular basis to play games here… this is the only way we can improve.”If you are coming here after four or five or six years, seven or eight guys are coming here for the first time. We are going to struggle.”Pakistan’s bowling woes were not helped by the number of injuries with pace spearhead Mohammad Amir in the treatment room for much of the series.”To win in Australia, your fitness is vital, in any other country you can survive but in Australia you need supreme fitness,” Misbah added.Misbah, who has said he will return to Pakistan before deciding on his future, thought the manner of the defeat in the second Test in Melbourne, where the tourists were dismissed for 163 on the final day, had been another decisive factor.”The last day of the MCG was the biggest disappointment of the tour and we got demoralised from that and could not recover,” he said. “This is how it is. Australia is not an easy place.”last_img read more

Silver Muse to Homeport at Port Everglades

first_imgzoom Florida’s Port Everglades revealed it will welcome Silversea Cruises’ newest cruise ship Silver Muse on October 12-13, 2017, and continue to serve as the cruise line’s winter homeport for the next two years.The announcement follows the agreement inked between Monaco-based Silversea Cruises and the Broward County Commission in Florida for an initial two-year period with the option to renew for an additional three years, with a maximum of twelve sailings annually.“Silversea Cruises has been a valued customer of Port Everglades for many years, and with the agreement in place, we look forward to welcoming Silversea’s newest flagship Silver Muse when it makes its US debut this fall,” Steven Cernak, Port Everglades Chief Executive & Port Director, said.Silversea Cruises has been sailing from Port Everglades since October 2000.In addition to voyages of Silver Spirit, Silver Whisper and Silver Wind also sailing from Port Everglades, the 596-passenger Silver Muse is scheduled for five sailings next year, according to the port.The construction of Silver Muse began at Fincantieri’s Sestri Ponente shipyard in Genoa in July 2015.Launched in July 2016, the 40,700 gross ton ship is scheduled for delivery in May 2017, VesselsValue’s data shows.last_img read more

A whole lotta songs by the same artists on Sirius XM Canada

first_imgCome on, an entire channel devoted to the music of Barbra Streisand? My plans to launch the world’s first Engelbert Humperdinck radio station appear to have hit a snag.“For a channel to go on 24/7, we need a catalogue of 400 songs,” notes Jeff Leake, music programming director at Sirius XM Canada.“If it’s just Engelbert Humperdinck, what 400 songs?’’ Let me think: there was “Release Me” in ’67, “After the Lovin’” in ’76, and uh . . . oh forget it.Two months into my free trial of Sirius Satellite Radio, I’m surprised at my lack of enthusiasm for its robotically curated genre stations (“70s on 7,” “60s on 6”) and tiring personality channels (“The Garth Channel,” “Willie’s Roadhouse”). LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisement Facebooklast_img read more

Particles pull last drops of oil from well water

first_imgShare2NEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to video and high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduParticles pull last drops of oil from well waterRice University engineers find nanoscale solution to ‘produced water’ problemHOUSTON – (Aug. 15, 2018) – Oil and water tend to separate, but they mix well enough to form stable oil-in-water emulsions in produced water from oil reservoirs to become a problem. Rice University scientists have developed a nanoparticle-based solution that reliably removes more than 99 percent of the emulsified oil that remains after other processing is done.A video shows a sample of emulsified oil and water separating when shaken and under the influence of magnetic nanoparticles created at Rice University. Courtesy of the Biswal LabThe Rice lab of chemical engineer Sibani Lisa Biswal made a magnetic nanoparticle compound that efficiently separates crude oil droplets from produced water that have proven difficult to remove with current methods.The research is detailed in a paper in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology. http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0820_DEMULSIFY-3-web-1yw4ube.jpgRice University engineers have created a method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to separate emulsified oil and water at wells. From left: Sibani Lisa Biswal, Maura Puertoand Qing Wang. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0820_DEMULSIFY-2-web-235zd4i.jpgRice research scientist Maura Puertoand alumna Qing Wangprepare a sample for testing in the Rice lab of Sibani Lisa Biswal. The team created a method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to pull the last drops of oil from produced water at wells. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis https://youtu.be/KX3xQrZdR08CAPTION: A video shows a sample of emulsified oil and water separating when shaken and under the influence of magnetic nanoparticles created at Rice University. (Credit: Biswal Lab/Rice University)Images for download: Return to article. Long DescriptionRice engineers have developed magnetic nanoparticles that separate droplets of oil from produced water. The particles draw in the bulk of the oil and are then attracted to the magnet, as demonstrated here. Photo by Jeff Fitlow“It’s often hard to design nanoparticles that don’t simply aggregate in the high salinities that are typically found in reservoir fluids, but these are quite stable in the produced water,” Biswal said.The enhanced nanoparticles were tested on emulsions made in the lab with model oil as well as crude oil.In both cases, researchers inserted nanoparticles into the emulsions, which they simply shook by hand and machine to break the oil-water bonds and create oil-nanoparticle bonds within minutes. Some of the oil floated to the top, while placing the test tube on a magnet pulled the infused nanotubes to the bottom, leaving clear water in between.Best of all, Biswal said, the nanoparticles can be washed with a solvent and reused while the oil can be recovered. The researchers detailed six successful charge-discharge cycles of their compound and suspect it will remain effective for many more.She said her lab is designing a flow-through reactor to process produced water in bulk and automatically recycle the nanoparticles. That would be valuable for industry and for sites like offshore oil rigs, where treated water could be returned to the ocean.Co-authors of the paper are Rice research scientist Maura Puerto, Rice alumnus Sumedh Warudkar of Shell Oil Products and Jack Buehler, principle consultant at Shell Global Solutions.-30-Read the abstract at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2018/ew/c8ew00188j#!divAbstractFollow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Biswal Lab: http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~biswalab/Biswal_Research_Group/Welcome.htmlRice Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering: https://chbe.rice.eduRice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering: https://msne.rice.eduVideo: Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long Description Rice research scientist Maura Puerto and alumna Qing Wang prepare a sample for testing in the Rice lab of Sibani Lisa Biswal. The team created a method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to pull the last drops of oil from produced water at wells. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)center_img Rice University engineers have developed magnetic nanoparticles that separate the last droplets of oil from produced water at wells. The particles draw in the bulk of the oil and are then attracted to the magnet, as demonstrated here. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long Description http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/08/0820_DEMULSIFY-1-web-1rxjvg3.jpgRice University engineers have developed magnetic nanoparticles that separate the last droplets of oil from produced water at wells. The particles draw in the bulk of the oil and are then attracted to the magnet, as demonstrated here. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice research scientist Maura Puerto and alumna Qing Wang prepare a sample for testing in the Rice lab of Sibani Lisa Biswal. The team created a method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to pull the last drops of oil from produced water at wells. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice University engineers have developed magnetic nanoparticles that separate the last droplets of oil from produced water at wells. The particles draw in the bulk of the oil and are then attracted to the magnet, as demonstrated here. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Rice University engineers have created a method that uses magnetic nanoparticles to separate emulsified oil and water at wells. From left: Sibani Lisa Biswal, Maura Puerto and Qing Wang. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionRice research scientist Maura Puerto and alumna Qing Wang prepare a sample for testing. Photo by Jeff FitlowProduced water comes from production wells along with oil. It often includes chemicals and surfactants pumped into a reservoir to push oil to the surface from tiny pores or cracks, either natural or fractured, deep underground. Under pressure and the presence of soapy surfactants, some of the oil and water form stable emulsions that cling together all the way back to the surface.While methods exist to separate most of the oil from the production flow, engineers at Shell Global Solutions, which sponsored the project, told Biswal and her team that the last 5 percent of oil tends to remain stubbornly emulsified with little chance to be recovered.“Injected chemicals and natural surfactants in crude oil can oftentimes chemically stabilize the oil-water interface, leading to small droplets of oil in water which are challenging to break up,” said Biswal, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and of materials science and nanoengineering.The Rice lab’s experience with magnetic particles and expertise in amines, courtesy of former postdoctoral researcher and lead author Qing Wang, led it to combine techniques. The researchers added amines to magnetic iron nanoparticles. Amines carry a positive charge that helps the nanoparticles find negatively charged oil droplets. Once they do, the nanoparticles bind the oil. Magnets are then able to pull the droplets and nanoparticles out of the solution.last_img read more