Johnson’s OT deflection for Lightning puts Penguins on brink of elimination

first_imgTampa Bay Lightning’s Tyler Johnson (9) celebrates is goal as the puck kicks out of the net behind Pittsburgh Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury (29) during the overtime period of Game 5 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Eastern Conference finals, Sunday, May 22, 2016, in Pittsburgh. The Lightning won 4-3 in overtime. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) Just in time for his seventh — and most important — goal of the playoffs. The Lightning are 12-1 in the last 13 postseason games in which Johnson has scored, his fortunate bounce Sunday coming two days after he received stitches and lost some teeth after a puck smashed into his face during warmups before Game 4. He didn’t miss a shift that night. He didn’t miss the net in overtime 48 hours later, even if he wasn’t technically aiming for it.“He’s a winner, that’s what winners do,” Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper said of Johnson. “They don’t back down.”Even on the road. Even down a pair of goals. Even trailing by one heading into the third period against a team that began the night 46-0 on the season when leading after two. Yet Tampa Bay survived by consistently and expertly counterpunching every time the Penguins provided an opportunity.Nikita Kucherov scored twice to boost his postseason total to an NHL-best 11 — including a wraparound that beat Marc-Andre Fleury and tied it at 3 with just 3:16 left in regulation. Alex Killorn picked up his fifth of the playoffs as the Lightning handed the Penguins consecutive losses for the first time since January. Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 31 shots to outplay Fleury, who returned to the lineup for the first time in more than seven weeks.Fleury finished with 21 saves, but couldn’t protect leads of 2-0 and 3-2.“It wasn’t the best I have felt in a game,” Fleury said. “Still, I have been practicing a lot, so I should have been better.”Brian Dumoulin, Chris Kunitz and Patric Hornqvist scored for the Penguins, who appeared to be in firm control at certain points only to find themselves on the brink of elimination.“This is the first time we’ve been in this position,” coach Mike Sullivan said. “I know our guys will respond the right way. They have for four months, five months now.”If the Penguins want to play at least one more game in Pittsburgh this season, they don’t really have a choice. While the Penguins have peppered Vasilevskiy for the better part of five games, the Lightning keep finding ways to create quality chances around the Pittsburgh net, though Garrison’s flick toward Johnson might not exactly qualify.“No shot’s a bad shot in overtime,” Garrison said with a laugh.Back in his customary starting spot for the first time in 52 days after dealing with a concussion that coincided with the rise of rookie Matt Murray, Fleury appeared to be plenty fresh. He sprinted in full gear onto the Consol Energy Center ice for his 100th career playoff appearance and looked fine while making a split save on Johnson in the second period that few of his brethren can pull off. He was helped by teammates more than willing to get on their bellies. The Penguins blocked 22 shots before they even made it to the goal crease and continued their series-long dominance in creating pressure at the other end.Dumoulin’s first goal in 17 months in the final second of the first period put Pittsburgh in front. Hornqvist’s tap-in off Carl Hagelin’s feed made it 2-0 just 90 seconds into the second.The Lightning hardly panicked.Killorn drew Tampa Bay within a goal 13:15 into the second on a wrist shot from the left circle that went in and out of the goal so quickly play continued for a few seconds before referees pointed to the red goal light. Kucherov tied it 70 seconds later on an easy one-timer. Kunitz’s rebound with 1:30 left in the second gave the Penguins another late-period boost.For the first time all year, it didn’t hold up. Ryan Callahan saw a shot ring off the far post and along the goal line — but not across it — with 3:50 remaining in what appeared to be Tampa Bay’s last best chance. Barely 30 seconds later, Kucherov was flying behind the Pittsburgh net to tie it up and set the stage for Johnson, who is putting off dental surgery until after the season — calling it an easy decision to make.NOTES: Former professional wrestler Shawn Michaels (nicknamed “The Heartbreak Kid”) watched from the fourth row next to former Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel. Michaels came at the behest of the Penguins, who have dubbed the highly effective line of Hagelin, Nick Bonino and Phil Kessel the “HBK” line. Michaels ate an “HBK” sandwich before the game and wore a black Penguins jersey adorned with the No. 156, the combined sum of Hagelin (62), Kessel (81) and Bonino’s (13) numbers. … Pittsburgh forward Beau Bennett made his postseason debut, replacing Conor Sheary on a line with Crosby and Hornqvist. … Both teams were 0 for 3 on the power play. Mila Kunis Drops Jaws In Recent PhotosStyleBistro Sponsored Links You Won’t Believe What These 70’s Beauties Look Like Now!!Definition Sponsored Linkscenter_img Mila Kunis Drops Jaws In Recent PhotosStyleBistro You Won’t Believe What These 70’s Beauties Look Like Now!!Definition Just in time for his seventh — and most important — goal of the playoffs. The Lightning are 12-1 in the last 13 postseason games in which Johnson has scored, his fortunate bounce Sunday coming two days after he received stitches and lost some teeth after a puck smashed into his face during warmups before Game 4. He didn’t miss a shift that night. He didn’t miss the net in overtime 48 hours later, even if he wasn’t technically aiming for it.“He’s a winner, that’s what winners do,” Tampa Bay coach Jon Cooper said of Johnson. “They don’t back down.”Even on the road. Even down a pair of goals. Even trailing by one heading into the third period against a team that began the night 46-0 on the season when leading after two. Yet Tampa Bay survived by consistently and expertly counterpunching every time the Penguins provided an opportunity.Nikita Kucherov scored twice to boost his postseason total to an NHL-best 11 — including a wraparound that beat Marc-Andre Fleury and tied it at 3 with just 3:16 left in regulation. Alex Killorn picked up his fifth of the playoffs as the Lightning handed the Penguins consecutive losses for the first time since January. Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 31 shots to outplay Fleury, who returned to the lineup for the first time in more than seven weeks.Fleury finished with 21 saves, but couldn’t protect leads of 2-0 and 3-2.“It wasn’t the best I have felt in a game,” Fleury said. “Still, I have been practicing a lot, so I should have been better.”Brian Dumoulin, Chris Kunitz and Patric Hornqvist scored for the Penguins, who appeared to be in firm control at certain points only to find themselves on the brink of elimination.“This is the first time we’ve been in this position,” coach Mike Sullivan said. “I know our guys will respond the right way. They have for four months, five months now.”If the Penguins want to play at least one more game in Pittsburgh this season, they don’t really have a choice. While the Penguins have peppered Vasilevskiy for the better part of five games, the Lightning keep finding ways to create quality chances around the Pittsburgh net, though Garrison’s flick toward Johnson might not exactly qualify.“No shot’s a bad shot in overtime,” Garrison said with a laugh.Back in his customary starting spot for the first time in 52 days after dealing with a concussion that coincided with the rise of rookie Matt Murray, Fleury appeared to be plenty fresh. He sprinted in full gear onto the Consol Energy Center ice for his 100th career playoff appearance and looked fine while making a split save on Johnson in the second period that few of his brethren can pull off. He was helped by teammates more than willing to get on their bellies. The Penguins blocked 22 shots before they even made it to the goal crease and continued their series-long dominance in creating pressure at the other end.Dumoulin’s first goal in 17 months in the final second of the first period put Pittsburgh in front. Hornqvist’s tap-in off Carl Hagelin’s feed made it 2-0 just 90 seconds into the second.The Lightning hardly panicked.Killorn drew Tampa Bay within a goal 13:15 into the second on a wrist shot from the left circle that went in and out of the goal so quickly play continued for a few seconds before referees pointed to the red goal light. Kucherov tied it 70 seconds later on an easy one-timer. Kunitz’s rebound with 1:30 left in the second gave the Penguins another late-period boost.For the first time all year, it didn’t hold up. Ryan Callahan saw a shot ring off the far post and along the goal line — but not across it — with 3:50 remaining in what appeared to be Tampa Bay’s last best chance. Barely 30 seconds later, Kucherov was flying behind the Pittsburgh net to tie it up and set the stage for Johnson, who is putting off dental surgery until after the season — calling it an easy decision to make.NOTES: Former professional wrestler Shawn Michaels (nicknamed “The Heartbreak Kid”) watched from the fourth row next to former Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Brett Keisel. Michaels came at the behest of the Penguins, who have dubbed the highly effective line of Hagelin, Nick Bonino and Phil Kessel the “HBK” line. Michaels ate an “HBK” sandwich before the game and wore a black Penguins jersey adorned with the No. 156, the combined sum of Hagelin (62), Kessel (81) and Bonino’s (13) numbers. … Pittsburgh forward Beau Bennett made his postseason debut, replacing Conor Sheary on a line with Crosby and Hornqvist. … Both teams were 0 for 3 on the power play.,PITTSBURGH (AP) — Tyler Johnson turned toward the net, wary of taking another shot to his already battered face.The puck off Jason Garrison’s stick found him anyway, and this time he didn’t even feel it. He was too busy celebrating lifting the Tampa Bay Lightning to within one win away from a return trip to the Stanley Cup Finals.Garrison’s wrister smacked off Johnson’s back and into the Pittsburgh Penguins net 53 seconds into overtime on Sunday night, giving the Lightning a 4-3 victory and a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series. A year after falling to the Chicago Blackhawks in the Cup finals, Tampa Bay can head back to the championship round with a win in Game 6 at home on Tuesday.“I was just battling in front,” Johnson said. “I saw Garry starting to shoot it, thought he was going for my head again, so I turned around.” PITTSBURGH (AP) — Tyler Johnson turned toward the net, wary of taking another shot to his already battered face.The puck off Jason Garrison’s stick found him anyway, and this time he didn’t even feel it. He was too busy celebrating lifting the Tampa Bay Lightning to within one win away from a return trip to the Stanley Cup Finals.Garrison’s wrister smacked off Johnson’s back and into the Pittsburgh Penguins net 53 seconds into overtime on Sunday night, giving the Lightning a 4-3 victory and a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series. A year after falling to the Chicago Blackhawks in the Cup finals, Tampa Bay can head back to the championship round with a win in Game 6 at home on Tuesday.“I was just battling in front,” Johnson said. “I saw Garry starting to shoot it, thought he was going for my head again, so I turned around.”last_img read more

Ready for dust up

first_imgBy KEN MOORE and RUSSELL BENNETT Ellinbank and District Football League – elimination finals preview Warragul Industrials v Kooweerup WARRAGUL…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Cranbrook joins BC Hockey League as 18th franchise

first_imgThe BC Hockey League announced today that the city of Cranbrook has been awarded an expansion franchise.The Cranbrook Bucks will become the league’s 18th team and will begin play in the 2020-21 season, playing out of Western Financial Place in Cranbrook.“We are pleased to add Cranbrook as the 18th member of the BC Hockey League,” said BCHL Commissioner Chris Hebb. “The city already has a rich hockey history and we are excited to see them add to that legacy and bring BCHL hockey to another great community in our province.” The Bucks are led by Majority Owner and President Nathan Lieuwen.Lieuwen was previously a professional goaltender, playing five seasons in the AHL and ECHL and also suiting up for seven NHL games with the Buffalo Sabres in the 2013-14 season. He also had a brief stint in the BCHL as a member of the Westside Warriors in 2007-08 where he played 11 games.“We are extremely excited to bring a BCHL franchise to Cranbrook and the East Kootenay,” said Lieuwen. “The Cranbrook Bucks Hockey Club looks forward to being a proud member of the Cranbrook community and surrounding areas for many years to come. We are grateful for all parties involved in bringing the BCHL to Cranbrook and we can’t wait for the puck to drop for the 2020-21 season.”The mayor of Cranbrook is equally excited to bring a BCHL team to the city.“Having a BCHL franchise showcasing an exciting brand of hockey will be a great addition to the economic well-being of the City,” said Lee Pratt, Mayor of the City of Cranbrook. “Nathan and his group, along with City staff have worked closely together these last few months to bring this great entertainment to the citizens at an affordable price. We welcome the Bucks to Cranbrook and look forward to many years of exciting hockey.”The addition of Cranbrook will trigger a realignment of the current BCHL divisions which will be announced at a later date.last_img read more

Google Has Changed Political Debate Forever

first_imgWhen I was on the high school debate team, about 15 years ago, using the Internet was considered strange, if not cheating. We used photocopy machines, print magazines and academic journals almost exclusively. That time in the world’s history is now gone forever.When Sarah Palin and Joe Biden debated in front of one of the largest TV audiences in US election history last week, the two candidates might not have been Googling for facts during the debate, but millions of people watching the debate were. Today Google released some information about what kinds of things viewers were searching for as that debate unfolded, minute by minute. It is amazing both that viewers were able to do such a thing, in real time, and that we’re able to watch what people are searching for. The internet in general, and Google in particular, has substantially augmented this important part of public life.The collective search history provides an interesting look at the world’s reaction to what the candidates are saying. Google points out, for example, that one of the hottest searches of the night was “define:maverick.” I wouldn’t mind learning more about the word maverick myself but I’m struck by the evidence that so many people know the search protocol define: and are comfortable using it in a dynamic situation! Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… marshall kirkpatrick Other interesting, popular search queries mentioned in Google’s blog post today included:meaning of theocracywindfall profits taxnucular vs nuclear, nuclear pronunciation, palin nucular, and even nukular“When Senator Biden offered a civics lesson (“Article I of the Constitution defines the role of the vice president of the United States, that’s the Executive Branch”) many people checked, and learned that Article I of the Constitution describes the legislative branch of the U.S. government. The executive branch is described in Article II. Others just searched directly for the role of vice president and vice president duties.”It’s pretty incredible to know that these topics resonated enough with the public that they sought to learn more about them online. That people were even curious enough to ask is encouraging (at least for someone hoping the Democrats will win). Another technology that changed the debate experience was Current’s live video stream with a Twitter overlay, which we wrote about immediately after the first Presidential debate.The candidates may not have used online search while they were debating, but we sure hope they will every day they are in office. It’s changed fundamentally our relationship with politics and we hope that politicians can keep up. Maybe they can even take the lead. Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Analysis#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Robin’s Kickstarter Splash Points To Users’ Smartphone Storage War

first_imgRelated Posts Nextbit is not just any Kickstarter startup. The company, formed by Google and HTC alumni, unveiled its Robin smartphone earlier today and, as of this writing, nabbed more than half of its crowdfunding goal on the first day. So far, more than 1,100 backers have pledged upwards of $400,000 towards the $500,000 target, making Robin’s launch look like an inevitability. The reason for its success seems to stem from a very clear and straightforward message that cuts to the heart of a common complaint from mobile users: lack of storage. See also: Why Android Won’t Save BlackBerry, And BlackBerry Can’t Help AndroidCalled “the only cloud-first smartphone” by its makers, the device runs a customized version of Android that automatically offloads photos, apps and more, and stashes them online. Google’s mobile OS is already very cloud-centric, from Gmail to Google Photos. But Robin takes it another step further.  Storage WarsThe speed with which the Robin’s Kickstarter campaign has taken off can’t simply be down to the discounts on offer for early birds—it shows users really don’t want to worry about local storage any more.Our mobile devices increasingly manage to do more these days, which also means that people store more on them. But built-in phone storage can be expensive, as larger capacity models run at a premium. Meanwhile, features like SD card support are quickly going out of style, in favor of unibody designs unmarred by things like unsightly card slots or removable back covers. See also: Chip, The $9 Computer, Could Fuel An Explosion Of New ApplicationsRobin attacks this problem as its raison d’être. The device is more affordable than the full retail cost of other premium smartphones, at $399 (full price, though some $349 tier offers are still available at the present moment). For the money, it offers 32GB and 100GB of online space. That cloud storage is key. Rarely opened apps automatically dispatch themselves to the cloud, with their icons grayed out until you need to use (and download) them again. It also backs up full-sized photos over Wi-Fi. There’s another benefit of this approach. Like Google’s marketing approach for its Chromebooks, Robin’s promotional video practically says, “Don’t worry if you drop it in the drink [or see your dog chew on it], because you can just pick up where you left off.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJntCtPfgokThe phone boasts distinctive looks as well: Users can pick from a Mint or Midnight color theme, and the handsets come with a Snapdragon 808 processor, 3GB of RAM, a 13-megapixel camera and a 5.2-inch 1080p IPS LCD display. Devs, Start Slimming Those AppsNextbit’s success points to the frustrations today’s mobile users put up with, and if this marks the beginning of a trend, then many app makers may have to consider more lightweight approaches to building their software and services. Users likely lose patience first with large apps or apps that cache a lot of data. Games can be some of the worst culprits, and the category could explode further still, if trends like virtual reality explode. But really, any kind of media application is also most probably a storage hogger (particularly if it doesn’t have a strong cloud component).Consumers are clearly nonplussed at having to pay so much for larger phone-storage capacity, just to manage their apps and photos. While, it’s too soon to say if Robin’s tactic hits on the right formula to solve this dilemma, early signs look good. The approach itself, however, is not entirely revolutionary—in fact, it’s somewhat similar to the approach Google and Apple are already taking. An Android or iPhone user can now quickly retrieve apps, contacts, emails and photos with a single sign in on a new phone, even if the process isn’t as intuitive or as seamless as Nextbit is trying to make it. iTunes, Google Play, as well as third-party apps like Netflix and Spotify, already keep content in the cloud and download it as needed. What the Robin brings to the table, though, is an intelligent, automatic clear-up process that saves users the effort of doing the same job manually. Or at least, that’s the claim. Cloudy MattersFor tech makers, cloud storage may seem like the answer to some major problems, but it’s not a panacea. It can come with its own set of issues for them and their users—such as available bandwidth, data use, cost and connectivity. Still, if Nextbit’s early Kickstarter popularity proves anything, it’s that developers need to work on syncing solutions that operate like magic—without leaving users with a huge data bill or a buffering icon at the end of it. That’s not easy. As of 2015, plenty of users still want that local, offline option despite their storage woes—Amazon beat Netflix to the punch with an offline mode earlier today—and that’s likely to continue until high speed Internet access becomes more ubiquitous and inexpensive. Meanwhile, Google and Apple will probably watch Nextbit’s rise with interest. So don’t be surprised if iCloud and Google Drive become even more essential to their respective platforms in the years to come.Images courtesy of Nextbit Why Your Company’s Tech Transformation Starts W… These Mistakes Can Derail a Legacy Software Con… How AI is Learning to Play with Wordscenter_img david nield Leveraging Big Data that Data Websites Should T… Tags:#Android#cloud#mobile#Nextbit#smartphones#The Robin last_img read more

This amazing blue tarantula is a new spider species—but did researchers break the law when they studied it?

first_img By Yao-Hua LawFeb. 27, 2019 , 12:00 PM Chien Lee This amazing blue tarantula is a new spider species—but did researchers break the law when they studied it? A spectacular spider is new to science. A female of the world’s most recently named tarantula species has electric-blue legs and a creamy toffee body. She’s native to the state of Sarawak in Malaysia and would fit nicely in your palm. Spider fanciers were thrilled when the new species came to light. But its emergence also highlights a growing illegal trade in tarantulas and researchers’ laissez-faire attitudes about dubious specimens.The spider was described in the February issue of The Journal of the British Tarantula Society by arachnologists Ray Gabriel and Danniella Sherwood, who list their affiliation as the Hope Entomological Collection, Oxford University Museum of Natural History in the United Kingdom. They classified the spider as a new species in a new genus and named it Birupes simoroxigorum. Its genus name stems from biru, the Malay word for blue; simoroxigorum incorporates names of the children (Simon, Roxanne, and Igor) of the three European collectors who provided the specimens. They captured the animals in the forests of Sarawak and transported them to Europe. But the Forest Department of Sarawak says they lacked permits to collect or export wildlife.”This case reflects the all-too-prevalent bio-piracy in Malaysia,” says Chien Lee, a naturalist and photographer in Sarawak. With Lars Fehlandt, a German photographer, Lee found the tarantula in September 2017, about 6 weeks before the collectors did, and posted photographs online.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Sherwood says she and her co-author “had no reason to believe” that the specimens were illegal. They received two dead spiders from the collectors “in good faith, meaning that we were told they were legally collected with all appropriate paperwork needed,” she wrote in an email. Science requested that Sherwood provide records of those permits, but she did not respond. Gabriel did not respond to requests for comment.The collectors, Krzysztof Juchniewicz, Emil Piorun, and Jakub Skowronek—based in Poland and the United Kingdom—find, breed, and sell tarantulas. Juchniewicz concedes they had no permit for collection, saying he didn’t know they needed one. But he insists they didn’t smuggle the tarantulas out of Malaysia, saying their driver mailed the spiders to Europe. “I’ve got all the necessary documents” for legal import, he says. “We didn’t do anything wrong.” (The other two collectors didn’t respond to requests for comment.)Science reconstructed their expedition to Sarawak in October and November 2017 from the collectors’ public Facebook posts, online chats with Juchniewicz provided by Fehlandt, and an interview with Juchniewicz. The three had been planning the trip for months. But they likely found out about what would make a prize catch just a few weeks earlier, on 14 September 2017, when Lee and Fehlandt posted their photos. The photographers named a nearby city as the vicinity of the sighting—a decision Lee now regrets.After the collectors trekked many kilometers over “plenty of nights” in “every type of jungle,” they triumphantly announced on Facebook that they found their target on the night of 2 November 2017. In photos, each of the three men gingerly holds the then-unnamed B. simoroxigorum. (The photos were removed after this article was published.)Sometime after their return to Europe, Juchniewicz, Piorun, and Skowronek passed two dead specimens to Gabriel and Sherwood for identification. When the arachnologists announced the tarantula qualified as a new genus and species, Juchniewicz posted the news on his store’s Facebook page, saying his greatest dream had come true.Piorun and Skowronek are now advertising the species for sale through their online stores, asking for more than $300 for a juvenile. Peter Kirk, chairman of the British Tarantula Society in London, says he saw B. simoroxigorum spiderlings labeled as captive-bred at an exposition in the United Kingdom just a few weeks ago.But Juchniewicz, who is based in Dewsbury, U.K., and is not selling the species, says there are no captive-bred B. simoroxigorum spiders on the market. The two animals he and the other collectors took in Sarawak died without breeding, he says. All B. simoroxigorum on the market have been caught in the wild and smuggled in “very, very big amounts” by others, he says.”Illegal tarantula collecting is a burgeoning problem worldwide,” says tarantula expert Rick West of Sooke, Canada. Collectors are meeting demand for “prettier, rarer, nastier, larger” spiders. Illegal collectors have long favored Brazil and Mexico, he says, but have begun to shift their hunts to Southeast Asia.Engkamat Lading, deputy controller of Wildlife Sarawak, says his powers to prevent illegal trade stop at the border. Although collecting nonprotected wildlife without a permit in Sarawak is punishable with a year in prison, he says, “how to get hold of [the collectors]? They have left Sarawak.” He hopes to get the three collectors banned from re-entering Sarawak.Joseph Koh, an arachnologist at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum in Singapore and author of several guides on spiders in Southeast Asia, says collectors sometimes dig up tarantula nests and destroy the arachnids’ sites. “As such spiders are rare to begin with,” Koh says, “wiping out their few remaining habitats, and destroying or capturing the juveniles, will definitely threaten the survival of such vulnerable species.”In the United States and Canada, it is a crime to violate the wildlife laws of another country, but no EU country forbids it, says Ernie Cooper, a wildlife trade specialist in Vancouver, Canada, and a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature Spider and Scorpion Specialist Group. As a result, Cooper says, “The primary market for illegally collected or traded tarantulas is the EU.” Those spiders can then easily be exported to North America, Pedro Cardoso and Caroline Fukushima, biologists at the University of Helsinki who study illegal trade in tarantulas and scorpions, wrote in an email.The arachnologists, however, may have broken U.K. laws. In signatory countries of the Nagoya Protocol, including the United Kingdom, taxonomists must ensure that specimens they study are legal. Darren Mann, head of zoology at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, tells Science that the arachnologists who worked on the new tarantula are not staff members and that the museum won’t house specimens collected illegally. Ray Hale, the British Tarantula Society’s vice-chairman and an arachnologist in Sussex, adds that Gabriel and Sherwood “have been naïve in the extreme” about the sources of the specimens they examined.Charles Leh, who retired in 2018 after 35 years as a curator at the Sarawak Museum, appreciates foreign taxonomists’ contributions because there is little local interest. But he contends that Gabriel and Sherwood should have been more cautious and not used poached specimens.Conservation of tarantulas and other spiders gets little attention from governments or advocacy groups, Cooper says. “Increased awareness of the problem might open up new opportunities” to address illegal tarantula trade, he says.With reporting by Erik Stokstad.last_img read more

David Luiz returns to Chelsea squad

first_imgChelsea David Luiz back in Chelsea squad, Conte confirms Omnisport Last updated 1 year ago 22:52 11/17/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) David Luiz and Antonio Conte - cropped Getty Images Chelsea Premier League David Luiz West Bromwich Albion v Chelsea West Bromwich Albion The defender was left out of the club’s 1-0 win over Manchester United but will return to the fold against West Brom this weekend Antonio Conte has confirmed David Luiz will return to Chelsea’s squad for the Premier League trip to West Brom on Saturday.The Brazil international was left out of the 1-0 win over Manchester United prior to the international break amid reports of a breakdown in his relationship with the Blues boss.Blues 13/10 to beat WBA to nil Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player But the defender is set to be involved at the Hawthorns and will join a fit-again Gary Cahill, who sat out England’s recent friendlies with a back problem.While Conte confirmed Michy Batshuayi will miss the match with an ankle injury, he would not be drawn into specifics surrounding the decision to drop David Luiz.”It was a technical decision and every single player has to react well and accept my decision. It’s normal,” Conte said at his pre-match press conference.”I do not like to speak about a single player. I like to speak about the team and the next game. This is most important.”The lads are training at Stamford Bridge today! pic.twitter.com/LYkucr83Mf— Chelsea FC (@ChelseaFC) November 17, 2017David Luiz’s absence against the Red Devils afforded Andreas Christensen another opportunity to shine as the young defender enjoys a breakthrough season at Stamford Bridge.”It is positive because last season, I didn’t have this opportunity to rotate,” he said.”This season I have another opportunity because Christensen is showing he’s an important player for us. He is showing great maturity.” Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

a month agoMan Utd manager Solskjaer hopeful Rashford returns before international break

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Man Utd manager Solskjaer hopeful Rashford returns before international breakby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer says he hopes to see Marcus Rashford back in action before the international break.The England forward was forced off during the second half of United’s loss to West Ham on Sunday.Solskjaer confirmed Rashford had sustained a groin injury and would wait on scan results.Speaking before Wednesday’s win over Rochdale in the Carabao Cup, the Norwegian said: “He’s recovering. “He’s not very, very bad so we hope to see him before the international break.” last_img read more

Trans Mountain pipeline work destroyed salmon habitat scientist says

first_imgVANCOUVER, B.C. – Work on a Trans Mountain pipeline crossing in a British Columbia stream has destroyed salmon habitat, raising concerns about the Crown corporation’s ability to build infrastructure through waterways if the expansion project proceeds, a scientist says.Mike Pearson says the “amateur hour” work on the Stewart Creek crossing in Chilliwack will reduce food sources for coho and chum salmon and limit their ability to hide from predators. The fish are part of the diet of endangered southern resident killer whales.“There was no consideration given whatsoever to the habitat, which is just not acceptable,” said Pearson, a biologist with 30 years’ experience, in an interview. Federal and provincial officials inspected the terminal in April and found improperly installed sediment and erosion control measures. A follow-up energy board report concluded Trans Mountain had fixed the problems by the end of November.Trans Mountain said in a statement that the BC Oil and Gas Commission approved its Stewart Creek work and found no issues in site inspections during and after construction.It said a third-party engineer designed the plan to protect the exposed line and conducted a study to ensure it would not impede fish passage. Environmental plans were created and work was monitored full-time by a qualified environmental professional, it said.As for Pearson’s 2015 criticism of the Sumas Mountain crossing, Trans Mountain said an independent environmental consultant completed an assessment and made a management plan. The work was monitored by an environmental professional and the oil and gas commission found no issues. It also said “extensive” sediment control measures and mitigation efforts are in place at its Burnaby terminal.The corporation added that field crews investigated all potential watercourse crossings for its expansion project even before it applied to the energy board for approval.“The information gleaned from this fieldwork allows us to avoid or minimize impact to fish and fish habitat during pipeline construction,” it said, adding environmental inspectors will monitor construction.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government has purchased the pipeline and expansion project for $4.5 billion.The expansion would triple the capacity of the existing line that runs from the Edmonton area to Burnaby. The energy board completed its first review in 2016 and recommended the government approve the project with 157 conditions.In its report, the board wrote the watercourse crossing plans “would effectively reduce the extent of effects on fish and fish habitat.”Ten conditions relate to fish, including that the company must file details on the presence of fish and fish habitat with the board before starting construction on watercourse crossings.Most of the conditions are “a plan to make a plan,” argued Eugene Kung, a lawyer with West Coast Environmental Law.“They don’t have any actual measurable effect on the outcome.”The Federal Court of Appeal quashed the project’s approval in August in part due to the board’s failure to consider marine shipping impacts. The government ordered the board to conduct a new review looking at this issue and produce a report by Feb. 22.Scientists and environmentalists say the new review, which is limited to 12 nautical miles off B.C.’s coast, is neglecting the streams and rivers that support salmon.Board spokesman James Stevenson said it will consider all evidence on the record relevant to assessing impacts of project-related marine shipping, including but not limited to impacts on southern resident killer whales.“Some parties have filed evidence regarding (southern resident) prey, including salmon,” he said.The board rejected Pearson’s evidence because Yarrow Ecovillage filed it nine days after a December deadline, but the board noted the evidence “may have some relevance as it pertains to salmon, which is a food source of the (southern residents).”Chinook salmon comprise roughly 80 per cent of southern resident orca diet in the summer, but chum, coho and steelhead trout make up about 14 to 18 per cent, and little is known of their winter diet, said Pearson in his filing with the energy board.Paul Spong, founder of Orca Lab research station on Vancouver Island, said chum are the whales’ second choice after chinook, adding that starvation is the biggest threat to their survival.“Anything that interferes with salmon using river systems is detrimental to the orcas.”center_img Trans Mountain Corp. filed documents with the National Energy Board showing its plans to cover exposed pipe in the Fraser Valley creek. It wrote that it would place concrete mats in the channel, extending about eight metres upstream and nine metres downstream of the exposed line, and cover it with small stones.Pearson said the work was completed in August to September of last year. He visited the site in December and took photos that he says show most of the stones have been swept away by currents, leaving the concrete blocks exposed.“The work has degraded habitat in several ways,” he wrote in an assessment filed with the energy board by intervener Yarrow Ecovillage.The smooth, hard concrete provides no hiding places for salmon, supports very few of the aquatic invertebrates they feed on, inhibits plant growth and prevents fish from burying their eggs, the document says.Pearson believes it’s not an isolated incident. An assessment he did of a pipeline creek crossing on Sumas Mountain in 2015 for Pipe Up Network, an anti-pipeline group, concluded the site was physically unstable and reconstructed with materials inappropriate to restoring habitat.A stream-keeper has also raised concerns about excavation at Trans Mountain’s terminal in Burnaby. John Preissl has filed several complaints with the energy board alleging the work has caused sediment to fall into two salmon-bearing creeks.last_img read more