Data Center Crisis – Part 3 – Getting Dense

first_imgThis is part three – the implication being that it is a sequel to part one and part two. It is. That said, each of the sections have their own messages and may or may not help your data center. The first part talked about the benefits of bringing in the latest hardware. Intel has been delivering performance increases at a pace beyond “Moore’s Law”. Getting rid of old, slow, inefficient servers can give you 2-12 times the capacity instantly. The second “episode” talked about getting everything you can from each server. Use virtualization and consolidation to make sure your servers are full and busy. The most efficient bus is a full bus ( this is a metaphor, I am talking about the big yellow things carrying students, not the circuitry in the box )My focus in part three is on density. My operating premise is that the data center manager wants to get everything out of the current data center and avoid, or at least defer, construction of a new data center. If your in the data center construction business, this is not for you. To get the most out of our data center we want to pack every server we can power into the space. You can do this by executing three actions. 1) Use every watt, 2) Build the right servers, and 3) Optimize HVAC. In many cases twice the servers can be crammed into the existing rack space even without adding power. If you are able to redirect your hvac power savings to your racks, your results could be even better.So, we potentially got 5x capacity from new quad core servers, 5x capacity from boosting utilization with consolidation, and 2x capacity with higher density. My math says 5x * 5x * 2x = 50x the capacity ( in the same space and power!) videolast_img read more

Cloud 2012: More Data. More Efficiency. More Devices.

first_imgPlease note: This blog originally apeard as a sponsored blog post in the Cloud area on InformationWeek.com.I often get asked for my thoughts on cloud computing and other data center trends. While I’ll stop short of calling anything a prediction, I can tell you what is top of mind for me and many of my colleagues this year.Unrelenting data growth will continue.There’s no stopping data growth. IDC predicts that by 2015Opens in a new window, the amount of information managed by enterprise data centers will grow by a factor of 50, and the number of files the data center will have to deal with will grow by a factor of 75. Mobile data traffic alone will increase 26 times between 2010 and 2015, reaching 6.3 exabytes per monthOpens in a new window by 2015, when nearly 70 percent of InternetOpens in a new window users will use more than five network-connected devices.As enterprises face an avalanche of data triggered by social media, application growth, and a proliferation of mobile devices, they need cost-effective ways to turn bits and bytes into meaningful information. Moreover, with 15 billion connected devices by 2015, the amount of data for manufacturing, retail, supply chain, smart grid, and many other applications will require new approaches to both batch and real-time analytics. Driven by this need, many organizations are developing distributed analytics platforms based on frameworks such as Hadoop.An open-source framework for the distributed processing of large datasets across server clusters, Hadoop enables fast performance for complex analytics through massively parallel processing. It also allows database capacity and performance to be scaled incrementally through the addition of more server and storage nodes. This approach is not without challenges as the usability and scalability of distributed analytics frameworks currently inhibit broad adoption.Best practices will drive efficiency gains.Cloud computing is one of the keys to dealing with massive amounts of data in a cost-effective manner while creating a more agile IT infrastructure.That’s the case at Intel IT, where our enterprise private cloudOpens in a new window is up and running and has already realized $9 million in net savings to date. More than 50 percent of our servers are now virtualized. We’ve reduced provisioning time from 90 days to 3 hours, and we see the day coming where provisioning will take place in minutes.Efficiency isn’t important only in the software and compute layers; it’s also a focus for best practices at the infrastructure and facility levels. One such best practice is high ambient temperature (HTA) data center operation. HTA raises the operating temperature within a data center to decrease operational and capital costs for cooling and enable energy savings to be used to power servers.Unfortunately, however, it’s not as simple as turning off the air-conditioning. The system design, rack and facility controls, and even technology component choices are critical and part of the reason that we’ve developed a blueprint of best practices that we share openly.Client-aware computing will become essential.In response to the proliferation and wide-array of devices, client-aware computing will be key focus in cloud data centers. In a client-aware environment, cloud-based applications both recognize and take advantage of the capabilities of the client device.Rather than providing services that are dumbed down to a lowest common denominator-or the capabilities of the most basic client devices-the cloud service adapts to deliver optimal service based on the device at hand, making full use of the capabilities of both the client and the server. Understanding the compute, graphics, battery life, security, and other attributes of the device can greatly improve the user experience while efficiently using data center and network bandwidth.Technology refresh will reinvigorate data centers.Organizations will refresh data center technology to pack more computing power into each square foot, drive down power and cooling costs, and increase the security of data and applications.With those goals in mind, I’m excited by the technology we’re delivering in our new Intel® Xeon® processor E5 platformsOpens in a new window. We’re introducing new technology for the performance and scale of big data, power management for data center efficiency, and Intel® Trusted Execution Technology (TXT) to address some of the security requirements of cloud datacenters.I believe 2012 is going to be a year of tremendous growth and innovation enabled by cloud computing. At Intel, we are thrilled to be a part of it.Follow @IntelITS for more news.last_img read more

Identity and Access in an Increasingly Fragmented Environment

first_imgThis blog is part 2 of 7 in a series focused on mobile security in the enterprise. For a full report, please click here.Which 4th Gen Intel® Core™ processor best fits your business needs? Click here to use our convenient comparison tool.For more conversations about IT Center and mobile security, click on the hashtags below:#itcenter #security Hardware-Based AuthenticationIntel vPro processor technology offers two-factor authentication that provides a simple way for web sites and business networks to validate that an actual user—not malware—is logging in from a trusted PC. This hardware-based support helps protect enterprise access points while reducing costs and complexity over traditional hardware-token or smart-card methods.For example, Intel Identity Protection Technology (Intel IPT) delivers hardware-secured VPN access by incorporating private keys, one-time password (OTP) tokens, and public key infrastructure (PKI) certificates. By eliminating the need for a separate physical token, it streamlines the VPN login process and, more importantly, ensures that the PCs accessing your VPN are those assigned to your employees. Because the credentials are secured inside the platform, the information cannot be compromised or removed from a particular PC. In today’s mobile business environment, strengthening and streamlining authentication is a critical part of protecting your network. Whether you’re securing VPN access or protecting access to software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications, a simple username and password solution is no longer enough. Many organizations have long deployed powerful authentication solutions using tokens or smart cards, or via software-only provisioning. However, recent data breaches have exposed vulnerabilities even with these baseline forms of account protection.last_img read more

How Caesars Entertainment Cut Big Data Processing Time from 6 Hours to 45 Minutes

first_imgHappy customers are the lifeblood of the entertainment industry.  But before you can make customers—and potential customers—happy, you’ve got to understand what they want. For Caesars Entertainment, that meant putting together a big data analytics system that could handle a new, expanded set of customer data for its hotels, shows, and shopping venues—with faster processing and better results.Expanded Data EnvironmentTo improve customer segmentation and build more effective marketing campaigns, Caesars needed to expand its customer data analysis to include both unstructured and semi-structured data. It was also important to speed up processing for analytics and marketing campaign management.Caesars built a new data analytics environment based on Cloudera’s Distribution Including Apache Hadoop (CDH) software running on servers equipped with the Intel® Xeon® processor E5 family. The new system reduced processing time for key jobs from 6 hours to just 45 minutes and expanded Caesars’ capacity to more than 3 million records processed per hour. It also enables fine-grained segmentation to improve marketing results and improves security for meeting Payment Card Industry (PCI) and other key security standards.Reaching New CustomersThe new environment makes it easier for Caesars to reach out to younger customers, who are likely to prefer using smart phones or tablets to get their information. Caesars’ new mobile app lets customers use their mobile devices to check rates and make reservations. That data goes to the Hadoop environment for analysis in real time, where Caesars can use it to fine-tune its operations. Caesars can even use this data to tailor mobile responses and offers on the fly based on factors like the customer’s preferences and location.Creating Personalized MarketingWith faster, better analysis of all data types, Caesars can now create and deliver personalized marketing, reaching a new generation of customers and winning their loyalty.You can take a look at the Caesars Entertainment solution here or read more about it here. To explore more technology success stories, visit www.intel.com/itcasestudies or follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

Chief Human Resources Officers will be the Next Security Champion in the C-suite

first_imgHR and security? Don’t be surprised. Although a latecomer to the security party, HR organizations can play an important role in protecting assets and influencing good security behaviors. They are an influential force when managing risks of internal threats and excel at the human aspects which are generally snubbed in the technology heavy world of cybersecurity. At a recent presentation given to the CHO community, I discussed several overlapping areas of responsibilities which highlight the growing importance HR can influence to improve the security posture of an organization.The audience was lively and passionate in their desire to become more involved and apply their unique expertise to the common goal.  The biggest questions revolved around how best they could contribute to security.  Six areas were discussed.  HR leadership can strengthen hiring practices, tighten responses for disgruntled employees, spearhead effective employee security education, advocate regulatory compliance and exemplify good privacy practices, be a good custodian of HR data, and rise to the challenges of hiring good cybersecurity professionals.  Wake up security folks, the HR team might just be your next best partner and a welcomed advocate in the evolving world of cybersecurity. Twitter: @Matt_RosenquistOpens in a new windowIT Peer Network: My Previous PostsLinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/matthewrosenquistOpens in a new windowMy Blog: Information Security StrategyOpens in a new window Pivotal Role of HR in CybersecurityOpens in a new window from Matthew RosenquistOpens in a new window last_img read more

Critical Topics for Cybersecurity Professionals

first_imgIt is important and difficult to stay current with relevant issues in our industry.  Cybersecurity is furiously changing, fast in its pace, and rising in global importance.  Professionals must not only keep abreast of what is happening today, but also what is emerging on the horizon and heading our direction.  Security becomes stronger when professionals collectively explore ideas and actively collaborate on developing better practices.  As a cybersecurity strategist, my eyes are fixed on the future risks and opportunities.  Here is my list of what we all must be learning, discussing, and deliberating about now, so we can be prepared for what lies ahead.Integrity Attacks will Rise to be the Next Wave in CyberOne constant in cybersecurity is the continual rise in sophistication and creativity of the threats.  We are seeing the beginnings of a fundamental expansion to attacker’s techniques.  Integrity compromises will rise and join the more familiar Confidentiality (ex. Data Breach) and Availability (ex. Denial-of-Service) attacks.  Integrity attacks undermine the trust of transactions and communications.  Ransomware, Business Email Scams, and financial transaction fraud, are all growing examples of integrity compromises.  This third-wave will drive significantly greater impacts due to their nature, the lack of available security tools, and weak processes to manage the risks.  We are already witnessing savvy attackers making hundreds of millions of dollars in a single campaign and will likely see a billion dollar heist by the end of the year.  Everyone is at risk.• The Great Bank Robbery: Carbanak cybergang steals $1bn from 100 financial institutions worldwide• $2.3 Billion Lost to CEO Email Scams: FBI Warns of Dramatic Increase in Business E-Mail Scams• Bangladesh Bank Hack: How a hacker’s typo helped stop a billion dollar bank heistIoT Security:  Where Digital Life-Safety and Privacy Issues meets ConsumersOur insatiable desire to integrate technology with our lives is changing the equation of security and safety.  With the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) devices going from 15 billion to 200 billion by 2020 and the focus by attackers to get more access to critical capabilities, we may be unwittingly handing life-safety controls to the cyber threats.  Such devices capture our conversations, video, health, activities, location, conversations, relationship connections, interests, and lifestyle.  Will personal discretion and privacy survive?IoT security is a huge and complex topic in the industry, earning the attention of everyone from researchers to mainstream media.  Although transportation, healthcare, critical infrastructure, and drones are capturing most of the interest, connected devices and sensors are destined to be interwoven throughout businesses and across all walks of life.  The benefits will be tremendous, as will the accompanying risks.• Growth of global IoT Security Market To Exhibit 55% CAGR As Threat Of Security Breaches Rises• Trust and security fears could hold back the Internet of Things• IoT and Privacy: Keeping Secrets from your Webcam• Police called after ‘drone’ hits plane landing at HeathrowWhy Ransomware will become the next scourge of securityThe rise of ransomware is phenomenal, fleecing hundreds of millions of dollars from consumers, businesses, and even government agencies.  This financial windfall for cyber criminals will fuel continued innovation, creativity, and persistence to victimize as many people as possible.  It has found a soft spot, taking advantage of human frailties while targeting something of meaningful value to the victim, then offering remediation at an acceptable price point. This form of extortion is maturing quickly, exhibiting a high level of professional management, coding, and services.  Ransomware is proving very scalable and difficult to undermine.  It will surely continue because it is successful.  Can it be stopped?  How can everyday people and businesses protect themselves? Will security solutions rally? What will we see next in the rapid evolution of ransomware?• Cyber Threat Alliance report: Lucrative Ransomware Attacks – Analysis of the CryptoWall Version 3• US Computer Emergency Readiness Team: Ransomware and Recent Variants• Hospital Declares ‘Internal State of Emergency’ After Ransomware InfectionWhat are the Hidden Long Term Impacts of Cybersecurity?The industry looks at cybersecurity as a series of never ending tactical issues to be individually addressed.  This is a symptomatic perspective, when the reality is a systemic problem.  The real impacts of the future are hidden from view and are staggering.  It is time we mature our perspectives and see the strategic problem and opportunities.  Estimates range from $3 trillion to $90 trillion dollars of global economic impact by 2030.  We as a community must understand the scale of the challenges and how addressing security in a tactical manner is simply not sustainable.  This is becoming a deep intellectual discussion topic among cyber strategists.  How do we change the mindset from short-term expensive fixes to a long-term effective treatment at a holistic level across the ecosystem?• The Hidden Costs of Cyber Attacks• Cybercrime may cost$2 trillion by 2019 • $90 trillion dollars cyber impact for one scenario affecting the global benefits of Information and Communications Technologies by 2030• 3 Trillion Aggregate economic impact of cybersecurity on technology trends, through 2020The Battle for Security Leads to the HardwareAs attackers evolve, they get stronger, smarter, and more resourceful.  It has become a cat-and-mouse game between the threats and the pursuing security capabilities.  The trend is for attackers to move further down the technology stack.  Each successively lower lever affords more control and the ability to hide from the security above.  The most advantageous position is in the hardware, where the root-of-trust originates.  The race is on.  Advanced researchers and attackers are looking to outmaneuver security by compromising hardware and firmware of devices.Traditional defensive structures must also advance to meet the new challenges.  Security features embedded or enhanced by hardware can be incredibly powerful to support effective defenses and visibility, even against the most advanced attacker.  Control of hardware and firmware will play an ever greater role in protecting technology and users.  Who will win?• The hardware roots of trust• Attackers Seek to Hack Hardware for Ultimate Control• Security on Silicon the Next Big Step in Cyber ProtectionJob Crisis in CybersecurityCybersecurity is in dire straits.  There is not enough talented security professionals to fill the need.  In a few years, there will be an estimated 1 ½-2 million unfilled cybersecurity positions.  This will have a catastrophic effect on securing people and technology.  Organizations have two problems; finding candidates to fill open positions and retaining the professionals they currently have from lucrative competitive offers.  The disparity between supply and growing demand drives up salaries, spurs aggressive headhunting, increases the costs of security operations, limits the overall comprehensiveness of shorthanded teams, and artificially extends the windows of opportunity for attackers.  It’s like trying to play competitive soccer without a full team in the field.The best way to correct the problem is to address the supply side of the equation.  More cybersecurity professionals are needed.  Long term, only academia can save cybersecurity and they are struggling to retool, to sufficiently prepare the next generation of security professionals.  Until then, this problem will affect every organization who needs security staff, potentially for years to come, and may drive up the use of Managed Security Service Providers (MSSP’s).• The Center for Cyber Safety and Education report: 2020 predictions expecting the shortfall of information security positions to reach 1.5 million• One Million Cybersecurity Job Openings In 2016• Higher Education Must Save Cybersecurity• Job Market Intelligence: Cybersecurity Jobs 2015 report published by Burning Glass TechnologiesCybersecurity Predictions for 2016A slew of expert predictions is now available from a variety of sources.  They typically come out by the end of the first quarter and although some are better than others, all of them provide perspectives for 2016 and beyond.  Peering into the future of cybersecurity provides valuable insights around the challenges and opportunities.  The industry is changing rapidly and attackers seem to always be one step ahead.  Take advantage of what the experts are taking about, but beware some are trying to sell you their wares.  Understand how anticipated trends will affect your organization, customers, and partners in the industry.  Plan how you can adapt to find a sustainable balance in managing the security of computing capabilities and technology.• Intel Security McAfee Labs 2016 Threat Predictions whitepaper  • Top 10 Cybersecurity Predictions for 2016 and Beyond • The Top 16 Security Predictions from Companies and MagazinesHow versed are you in these topics?  I believe they will have far reaching repercussions and every cybersecurity professional should understand these areas.  Those who benefit from the insights of the future, can be better prepared to adapt to the changes.Interested in more?  Follow me on Twitter (@Matt_Rosenquist) and LinkedIn to hear insights and what is going on in cybersecurity.last_img read more

The High Stakes Game of Health Data Analytics

first_imgPaid content supplied by John LynnWe’ve all had the experience where our smart phone or a consumer email list sends us an alert “customized to our preferences” that misses the mark. Experiences like these and many others teach us that we should be careful about how we use and trust data since the data could be wrong. That’s an extremely important lesson for healthcare as we enter a new world of healthcare reimbursement where what we get paid will largely be driven by data.  Done correctly, healthcare will lower costs, improve care, and better serve even the most vulnerable patients on the back of high quality data analytics. Done incorrectly, healthcare will treat the wrong patients, increase costs and miss helping the patients that need healthcare the most.  This is the high stakes game of health data analytics.Healthcare is currently being engulfed by data from every angle.  While this is extremely challenging, we’re seeing examples of successfully using the data to improve healthcare. For example, one university medical center used predictive analytics developed from a dataset of over 250,000 patient admissions to create an early warning system which can identify high-risk hospital ward patients and improve ICU triage decisions as much as 48 hours in advance. This is why healthcare data analytics is so important and essential to the future of healthcare.  The right data analytics at the right place at the right time is going to save lives and money.Stan Huff, CMIO at Intermountain, likes to share an experienceOpens in a new window they had in their hospital. When evaluating different treatments for patients at their hospital they found that one treatment would cause problems in 4 in 100 patients while an alternate treatment would only cause problems in 3 in 100 patients.  It turns out that the human mind can’t comprehend a difference in quality of 4 in 100 versus 3 in 100. However, computers can tell that difference.  This is the heart of health data analytics and illustrates why we need appropriately research health data analytics to assist in care.The challenge is that there are thousands of treatments, protocols, approaches, analytics, etc that need to be tested and evaluated for their efficacy. No one organization will be able to evaluate every healthcare analytic out there. We’re going to need to create a way to share health data analytics findings across organizations so that everyone benefits.We’re starting to see this type of sharing happening between healthcare organizations. Some organizations are doing it in an open source manner on the back of the FHIR protocol where any organization can take their work and implement it in their organization. Others are creating commercial platforms where a healthcare organization’s research can be commercialized and shared with other organizations. Both models can work, but we need hundreds and thousands of more organizations and people involved in this health data research and sharing if we really want to extract all of the benefits health data analytics can provide.  While cognitive computing and neural networks is showing promise, we still need humans to assist in the process.What’s particularly interesting about this high stakes “game” of healthcare data analytics is that those that are most successful are going to define what the future of healthcare will look like. Health data scientists’ analytics discoveries are going to create a standard of care that will be required of every healthcare organization.  It could literally be considered malpractice for someone to practice medicine contrary to what the health data says about a patient. Sure, there will be exceptions to the data analytic, but there will have to be some strong mitigating reasons to ignore the analytics and proceed down a different care path.The beauty of health data analytics is that we have a tremendous opportunity to improve care and lower healthcare costs. The scary part of health data analytics is that we could get it wrong and patients could lose their lives.last_img read more

A Hospital CIO Perspective on Precision Medicine

first_imgIn the below video interview, I talk with David Chou, Vice President, Chief Information and Digital Officer with Kansas City, Missouri-based Children’s Mercy HospitalOpens in a new window. In addition to his work at Children’s Mercy, he helps healthcare organizations transform themselves into digital enterprises.Chou previously served as a healthcare technology advisor with law firm Balch & Bingham and Chief Information Officer with the University of Mississippi Medical Center. He also worked with the Cleveland Clinic to build a flagship hospital in Abu Dhabi, as well as working in for-profit healthcare organizations in California.Precision Medicine and Genomic Medicine are important topics for every hospital CIO to understand. In my interview with David Chou, he provides the hospital CIO perspective on these topics and offers insights into what a hospital organization should be doing to take part in and be prepared for precision and genomic medicine.Here are the questions I asked him if you’d like to skip to a specific topic in the video or check out the full video interview embedded below:What’s the CIO’s perspective on precision medicine and genomics?Opens in a new windowWhat do you need to do to prepare your organization for the shift to precision medicine?Opens in a new windowWhat are some examples of where precision medicine-based care is already a reality?Opens in a new windowWho should lead precision medicine efforts?Opens in a new windowWhere do you think precision medicine is headed? What should CIOs expect to see happen ten or 20 years down the road?Opens in a new windowAre smaller healthcare players going to be able to participate in precision medicine and automation, or will they be shut out?Opens in a new windowDo you think precision care and genomic medicine are going to become the standard?Opens in a new windowWhat’s the most exciting thing you see happening in precision medicine, and how are you going to take advantage of it?Opens in a new windowWhat’s your approach to balancing on-premise storage and cloud storage?Opens in a new windowWhat would say to someone who thinks that talk of precision medicine is all hype?Opens in a new window What are you doing in your organization when it comes to precision and genomic medicine?last_img read more

Ousted Italian Space Agency Head in Race for E.U. Parliament

first_imgItalian space scientist Giovanni Bignami, who in 2008 was forced out as head of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), is running as a Democratic candidate in the European Union parliamentary elections to be held 6-7 June. Contesting from the country’s northwest constituency, the largest of Italy’s five electoral districts, Bignami hopes to win one of 72 seats available to Italian representatives. The body will comprise a total of 736  parliamentarians for the coming 5-year term.Bignami’s manifesto promises an improved status of research in Italy and greater leverage of the country’s membership in the E.U. He wants to give young people better access to careers in research and raise spending on science, which currently stands at 0.9% of the country’s GDP, one of Europe’s lowest.Bignami’s party faces a tough fight against the right-wing establishment, led by Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi, which dominates the current flock of 78 Italian Euro-MPs. Bignami certainly has a bone to pick with Berlusconi’s government, which removed him from the presidency of ASI last summer in a broader move to overhaul Italian research institutes. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Bignami is demanding clear objectives and assessment and transparency in the use of public funds. An endorsement on his campaign Web site from fellow Italian and physics Nobelist Carlo Rubbia says Bignami is “the right person to defend science, research, innovation, and the universities in Europe.”last_img read more

A New Journal for Translating Biomedical Discoveries

first_imgMoving discoveries out of the lab and into clinics has become one of the top goals of biomedical research leaders. They’ve called for programs to deploy research findings more rapidly and get young investigators interested in the nitty-gritty work of developing a new drug or treatment. Today AAAS, publisher of ScienceInsider, is stepping into this area with a new journal called Science Translational Medicine. The journal’s home page explains that translational medicine “builds on basic research advances – studies of biological processes using cell cultures, for example, or animal models – and uses them to develop new therapies or medical procedures.” Science Translational Medicine will publish research and commentary every Wednesday, and selected papers will appear in a monthly print edition. The journal’s Chief Scientific Adviser is Elias Zerhouni who, as director of the National Institutes of Health from 2002–2008, pushed to make translation a bigger part of NIH’s mission. Among the journal’s first papers: a tiny device for measuring breast cancer risk, a strategy for improving bone marrow transplants, and a study on potential new drugs for osteoporosis.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

NEON Gets Final Approval, Awaits Money to Start Construction

first_imgThe most ambitious U.S. effort to assess environmental change on a continental scale won final approval yesterday from the oversight body of the National Science Foundation (NSF). More than a decade in the making, the $434 million National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will establish 20 permanent monitoring stations to collect climate, environmental, and biological data on an ongoing basis. NEON will also include 40 temporary terrestrial sites and 46 aquatic sites. “For the merit review process, this was the high bar,” says David Schimel, CEO of NEON Inc., a nonprofit consortium that will build the network. Given that ecologists have never tried to do such a large-scale project, Schimel says “it’s an honor” to get this far. Yesterday’s action by the National Science Board authorizes the NSF director to award NEON Inc. a 5-year contract to construct the observatory, contingent upon funding from Congress and compliance with the Endangered Species Act. NSF has requested $20 million in its 2011 budget to begin construction. Schimel says the environmental assessments were completed in January and all the permits are in place for the first few sites. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Bat Caves Closed by Feds

first_imgTo stop the possible western spread of white-nose syndrome, the U.S. Forest Service has issued an order to temporarily shut all caves and abandoned mines on federal lands in Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas. In a press release, Bat Conservation International, whose staff includes a number of respected scientists, says it supports the measure: Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) White-nose Syndrome is the most severe threat ever faced by North American bats. More than 1 million bats have been killed by WNS since it was found in a single New York cave in 2006. Mortality rates at some hibernation sites have reached almost 100 percent, and species extinctions are increasingly likely. Top scientists are searching desperately for solutions, but they have found no means of curing or preventing this disease or even of slowing its disastrous spread. The one-year closure of western caves is an effort to buy time to examine all options. In this crisis, the decision is reasonable and prudent. Simply waiting for WNS to arrive before taking decisive action is far too risky.last_img read more

Italians Consider Hiding Seismic Data to Reduce Public ‘Melodrama’

first_imgShould scientists remove seismic databases from public view to prevent panic among civilians living in hazardous areas? Last week, the head of the Italian National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV), which monitors quakes through 400 stations spread all over Italy, said he is considering the possibility of refraining from publishing seismic data it collects. When questioned about the idea, the institute backtracked. The goal of INGV head Enzo Boschi’s idea, apparently, is to reduce the chance of the public and media overreacting to possible quakes. The proposal comes 3 months after an indictment was issued against seven members of the Italian committee for the evaluation of major risks—among them Boschi—for failing to predict last year’s quake in L’Aquila, central Italy. Last week, Boschi told the press agency ANSA that he is evaluating the possibility of shutting down the online national seismic database. Data, he says, are often used by media to get to unrealistic conclusions. “Anytime there is an earthquake [in Italy], there is always a melodrama.” Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Boschi blames Italian media for misrepresenting scientific data and acting as scaremongers. Head of the Italian Agency for Civil Protection Guido Bertolaso told the National Geological Society last week in Pisa, Italy: “I see as a negative sign the affirmation of the prophets of doom, instead of those who chose earth science as a reason for living.” Boschi and Bertolaso also highlight that Italian officials need a better way of evaluating seismic hazards, better building regulations, and improved construction practice as an essential part of making earthquakes less dangerous in the future. Brian Baptie, head of seismology at the British Geological Survey, agrees. But he says that withdrawing data would not be the best move for scientific institutions that monitor quakes. “Our data are widely available to the public and the media following any significant seismic event. I believe that prompt and objective information about earthquakes is essential to allay concern, to coordinate an appropriate emergency response, and to plan for future events,” he told ScienceInsider. While Boschi declined to talk to ScienceInsider, INGV’s spokesperson answered that he was essentially joking and that halting the publication of data was not a serious proposal.last_img read more

Rahul Gandhi Calls for Change

first_imgIndia’s ruling Congress party leader Rahul Gandhi, who has been promoted to the party’s number two position, has said he would work to transform the country by “decentralising” power. Related Itemslast_img