Formula E Jaguar IPace E Trophy Challenge Video

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 9, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy Season One Calendar Revealed Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy Track Test: The Dawn Of A New Era .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Watch As Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY Hits The Track Source: Electric Vehicle News I-Pace is ready to hit the track.Video description:Jaguar presents the world’s first ever all-electric production car-based racing series, the I-Pace E Trophy Challenge, it will be held on Formula-E street circuits featuring 20 identical cars, showcasing the skill of the driver.More I-Pace Race Newslast_img read more

California Mandates Electric Buses Only By 2040

first_img FedEx Acquires 1,000 Chanje V8100 Electric Vehicles Source: Electric Vehicle News Volvo VNR Electric Semi Truck To Hit California Roads Next Year Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 17, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News No later than 2029 public transit agencies will be required to purchase only zero-emission buses.The question is how fast the transition will progress in the case of private agencies.More details from the press release:“The Innovative Clean Transit regulation is part of a statewide effort to reduce emissions from the transportation sector, which accounts for 40 percent of climate-changing gas emissions and 80-90 percent of smog-forming pollutants. The transition to zero-emission technologies, where feasible, is essential to meeting California’s air quality and climate goals.Full implementation of the regulation adopted today is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 19 million metric tons from 2020 to 2050 – the equivalent of taking 4 million cars off the road. And it will reduce harmful tailpipe emissions (nitrogen oxides and particulate matter) by about 7,000 tons and 40 tons respectively during that same 30-year period.As longtime partners for clean air in California, the state’s 200 public transit agencies play a pivotal role in transitioning vehicle fleets away from fossil fuel-powered technologies to zero-emission alternatives. Eight of the 10 largest transit agencies in the state are already operating zero-emission buses, including battery electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.Transit agencies are particularly well suited for introducing these technologies.  They operate largely in urban centers, where pollution and noise are of greater concern. Their buses drive in stop-and-go traffic where conventional internal combustion engines waste fuel while idling. And their fleets run out of central depots where charging infrastructure can be installed and conveniently accessed.Deployment of zero-emission buses is expected to accelerate rapidly in the coming years – from 153 buses today to 1,000 by 2020, based on the number of buses on order or that are otherwise planned for purchase by transit agencies. Altogether, public transit agencies operate about 12,000 buses statewide.To successfully transition to an all zero-emission bus fleet by 2040, each transit agency will submit a rollout plan under the regulation demonstrating how it plans to purchase clean buses, build out necessary infrastructure and train the required workforce. The rollout plans are due in 2020 for large transit agencies and in 2023 for small agencies.Agencies will then follow a phased schedule from 2023 until 2029, by which date 100 percent of annual new bus purchases will be zero-emission.  To encourage early action, the zero-emission purchase requirement would not start until 2025 if a minimum number of zero-emission bus purchases are made by the end of 2021.CARB will continue to work with transit agencies on a successful transition and conduct regular reviews of progress.Benefits of the regulation are many:Transit-dependent riders, especially in disadvantaged and low-income communities, will breathe cleaner air and enjoy quieter rides.Transit agencies are expected to save $1.5 billion in maintenance, fuel and other costs by 2050 after the full buildout of infrastructure.The deployment of zero-emission buses in California will bring new workforce training and employment opportunities including high-quality manufacturing jobs to communities across the state.Electrifying the heavy-duty transportation sector is supported by a range of government policies and programs. Public funding for zero-emission vehicles and related charging infrastructure is administered by CARB, the California State Transportation Agency, Caltrans, the California Energy Commission, and local agencies.In addition, utilities are supporting this transition with new electricity rate designs and investments in charging infrastructure. The Department of General Services is also streamlining bus purchases through a single statewide zero-emission bus purchase contract.”Source: CARB No more diesel buses on the long-term horizon in CaliforniaThe California Air Resources Board announced the transition to 100% zero-emission public bus fleet by 2040 in California. The zero-emission means basically all-electric, as we don’t believe much in the hydrogen fuel cells.The first-of-its-kind plan in the U.S. is already approved and should enable to replace all 12,000 diesel buses in the state’s 200 public transit agencies to electric within 22 years. There are currently 153 zero-emission buses in the state, and it’s expected that by the end of 2020 it will be 1,000.More from California New Flyer Sold 77 Xcelsior CHARGE Electric Buses In Californialast_img read more

Tesla Roadster 2020 Elon Musk tempers expectations on timing boots SpaceX package

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Tesla has been guiding the release of a new generation of the Roadster in 2020, but Elon Musk warned that the new electric hypercar is only a “dessert” and not really a priority as Tesla focuses on other things. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Tesla Roadster 2020: Elon Musk tempers expectations on timing, boots SpaceX package appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

Researchers highlight enormous benefits and potential risks of digital recording in healthcare

first_imgMay 15 2018While data privacy has been a much-talked about topic lately–with questions still lingering about how giants like Facebook and Google are sharing our personal information–much less has been said about how we are going to manage digital information about our health in the future, particularly digital recordings of doctors’ visits.In an article recently published online in The BMJ, Dartmouth Institute researchers Glyn Elwyn, MD, and Paul Barr, PhD, together with patient co-author Sheri Piper, write about the enormous potential of digital recording to improve healthcare, as well as the pressing need to develop new policies on how to collect, manage, and store this data.The evidence that digital recording is the wave of the future is indisputable, they say. One, or more, in every 10 patients has recorded a doctor’s visit, usually on a cellphone. A few health care providers and organizations around the U.S. are adapting a proactive approach by offering their patients the opportunity to record their visits. For example, a neurological institute offers patients video recordings of their visits that are accessible via a secure website. Dr. James Ryan, a family physician in Michigan, has been offering to record visits with his patients since 2011. (The audio-files have been ‘tagged’ during the recording to help locate relevant parts of the talk.) At the same time, tech giants like Google and Amazon are “racing to create systems” that use recordings of doctor-patient conversations as a means to populate electronic health records.More than a few isolated ‘experiments,’ or even a trend, the authors say that recording the clinical visit will form the centerpiece of a health system evolution, with far-reaching implications for all stakeholders.Related StoriesMore than 936 million people have sleep apnea, ResMed-led analysis revealsComputers, games, crafting keep the aging brain sharpPerspectives on how to communicate to older adults about stopping cancer screening”A simple cellphone recording enables a patient to better remember important information or to share it with family members,” Elwyn says, “but ‘next-generation’ professionally produced recordings can be used to develop and further patient and family engagement, shared decision making, education, and research.”Accurate digital recordings that can be automatically coded also have the potential to combat physician burnout, the authors say, by “bringing back some sanity to a clinical process that has become encumbered by data entry burdens.” Record-keeping or documentation currently accounts for 50% of a practitioner’s time, with much of it occurring after hours, disrupting family lives.While the potential benefits of digital recordings are enormous, there are also serious implications for consent procedures, privacy, and cyber security, the authors say. Harvesting data from patient recordings of doctors’ visits could become a viable commercial prospect: Facebook has already declared an interest in health-related data, and DeepMind, a Google-owned artificial intelligence (AI) company acquired vast amounts of data from patients without their consent in a very controversial partnership with a London hospital. And, as of yet, there are no clear policies, let alone talk of regulatory or legal reform in this area.”We’re going to need to create a new model of personal health data ownership, similar to banking records,” Elwyn says. “But, even if we did that, there are still implications for privacy and cybersecurity; and the question is do we want to leave that solely in the hands of for-profit companies?” Source:http://tdi.dartmouth.edu/last_img read more

New autism screening app appears to be caregiverfriendly and reliable

first_img Source:https://nyulangone.org/ Jun 1 2018A study of an iPhone app used to screen young children for signs of autism shows that the app is a novel, easy to use, and scalable method for collecting high-quality and scientifically valid data, according to a new study published June 1 in the journal npj Digital Medicine.The app was developed to address the lack of scalable, reliable and validated tools for assessing young children’s emotions and behaviors outside of clinical settings. Built on Apple’s ResearchKit platform, the app called Autism & Beyond tested a novel method for in-home screening of young children for autism. The team developed mobile technology to collect videos of young children watching movies designed to elicit autism-related behaviors and then used computer vision algorithms to automatically code the children’s emotions and attention.Data from this coding software, which tracks the movement of landmarks on the child’s face and quantifies emotions and attention, found that children at higher autism risk-;based on caregiver reports and Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, or M-CHAT, a standard autism screening questionnaire-;demonstrated a more neutral response to visual stimuli meant to prompt a positive response, such as bubbles floating across the screen or a bunny.”The shortage of child mental health experts is a global issue, and we need new and ambitious solutions to address it,” says lead author Helen Egger, MD, the Arnold Simon Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and chair of the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at NYU Langone Health, who co-led the study with colleagues at Duke University Medical Center and Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering. “We seek to create apps that are feasible and scalable so that we can bring mental health resources into people’s homes and reach underserved children around the world.”How the App Works The entire study, from caregiver consent to video presentation and data collection, was completed within an iPhone app available for free on the Apple Store. Over one year, 1,756 families with children ages 1-6 years old participated in the study. Caregivers completed 5,618 surveys and uploaded 4,441 videos recorded using the smartphone’s front-facing camera. Usable data were collected on 88% of the uploaded videos, demonstrating the feasibility of using mobile technology to collect high-quality video of children in their natural environments.The app guided caregivers through an electronic consent process, after which they completed 3-4 brief questionnaires on topics such as family background, parental concerns, and potential symptoms of autism. If parents reported a high level of autism symptoms on the questionnaire, they were encouraged to seek further consultation with their health care providers.Related StoriesEyes hold clues to effective treatment of severe autism, study showsBullying in children with ASD gets worse with ageScientists make breakthrough in understanding the genetics of common syndromic autismParents were then prompted, with simple pictorial directions, to show the child four short movies that have been used in earlier lab-based research with young children. The caregiver could opt to upload the whole video of their child’s responses or just the facial landmarks extracted by embedded face detection software.Transforming Child Mental Healthcare with Digital Technology The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 1 in 59 children has autism spectrum disorder, making it the most common childhood neurodevelopmental disorder in the United States. While mental health professionals are often able to diagnose children as young as 18 months with autism, long wait times for clinical appointments and lack of public awareness means that on average, children aren’t getting diagnosed until closer to 4 years of age.Researchers who created Autism & Beyond sought to address this disparity by developing an app encouraging and enabling parents to identify young children’s autism risk earlier in life, allowing for earlier intervention and the ability to track changes over time. “Early detection is important because early intervention can have a significant impact on long term outcomes for individuals with autism,” says Geraldine Dawson, PhD, Director of the Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development and one of the co-leaders of the study.”We found that this app provided data consistent with what we see in a traditional clinical research setting,” says Dr. Egger. “This study lays the groundwork to create tools like this to evaluate other developmental and mental health challenges in early childhood in children’s homes.”At NYU Langone Health, Dr. Egger has established the WonderLab, a multidisciplinary team building a digital platform for assessing common early childhood challenges including picky eating, tantrums, anxiety, and sleep in children’s homes. The WonderLab apps will provide parents with evidence-based knowledge about their young child and guided advice about how to support their child’s mental health and development and seek clinical help if needed. “Building on the success of the autism screening app, we are using technology to transform how, when, and where we give parents and all who care for children access to the best evidence-based knowledge about young children.”last_img read more

Podcast Preindustrial sleep Pluto flyby and making pig organs fit for humans

first_imgJust how many hours did our ancestors sleep? Could pigs be back in the game for human organ donations? And how do you take a dinosaur’s temperature? Science’s Associate Online News Editor Catherine Matacic discusses these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi. Plus, New Horizons mission principal investigator Alan Stern talks about the latest results from the Pluto flyby.last_img

Pumping tons of lightscattering particles into the atmosphere could lessen hurricane damage

first_imgTo slow Earth’s warming, some scientists have proposed pumping tons of tiny light-scattering particles into the upper atmosphere to reflect sunlight back into space. A new analysis suggests that such “geoengineering” might also reduce the number of storm surges as big as the one that swamped New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The team used climate models to assess the effect of injecting various quantities of light-scattering sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere in a scenario where atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide reach 650 parts per million in the year 2100. (For comparison, in 2014, average atmospheric concentration of the gas was about 398.5 ppm and had risen about 2.1 ppm each year in the previous decade.) If engineers were to spray about 10 million metric tons of sulfur dioxide droplets into the stratosphere each year between 2020 and 2070, the number of storm surge inundations produced by large hurricanes each year after 2070 drops by about half, the researchers report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Much of the reduction in storm surge stems from slowing the rate of sea level rise (cooler Earth = glaciers melting more slowly, as well as less expansion of the upper layers of the ocean as they warm), the researchers note. But a reduction in the number and intensity of large hurricanes driving ocean waters on shore—such as this month’s Hurricane Joaquin, seen, which reached category 4 strength—may also play a role by cooling sea-surface temperatures that fuel the growth of these monster storms, the team notes. The strategy isn’t cheap: A 2009 study estimated that using aircraft to spray just 2 million metric tons of sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere would cost anywhere between $225 million and about $4.2 billion each year. And there could be unforeseen downsides, the researchers say, such as a decrease in stratospheric ozone or a shift in tropical weather patterns that could end up aggravating droughts in arid regions.last_img read more

Rice so nice it was domesticated thrice

first_img By Dennis NormileOct. 10, 2017 , 3:45 PM MARKA/Alamy Stock Photo Rice so nice it was domesticated thrice Rice is unique among wild plants for having been domesticated independently on three continents: Asia, Africa, and now South America, researchers have discovered. The New World variety, tamed about 4000 years ago, apparently was abandoned after Europeans arrived. But its genetic legacy could potentially help improve Oryza sativa, the Asian rice species that is now a dietary staple for half the world’s population.Despite widespread consumption of wild rice by indigenous peoples, scant evidence supported the grain’s domestication in the New World. But botanists have become increasingly adept at analyzing phytoliths, microscopic bits of silica drawn from the soil that accumulate in the tissues of plants as they grow. Phytoliths persist after the vegetation decays and scientists can decipher, from their shapes, the genus and sometimes the species of plant in which they formed and whether they came from the stalk, leaves, or seeds.A group led by archaeobotanist José Iriarte of the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom examined 320 rice phytoliths recovered from a trench at Monte Castelo, an archaeological site in the southwestern Amazon basin in Brazil that was occupied for millennia: from more than 9000 years ago into the 14th century. The phytoliths increased in size and number from the oldest layers of the dig to the youngest, indicating that “wild rice was modified by human intervention to produce larger grains,” the authors conclude in a paper published online this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution. It’s “another proof of the ingenuity of Native American plant breeders,” Iriarte says. “The paper is convincing,” says Charles Clement, a plant geneticist at the National Institute of Amazonian Research in Manaus, Brazil, who was not involved in the study. Previous investigators missed rice domestication in the region, he says, because phytolith analysis “has only started to be used to search for signs of domestication (in Amazonia) in the last decade.” “Whether in Asia, Africa, or South America, local populations recognized the great potential of the Oryza plants and made use of them, which finally led to the advent of domesticated rice,” adds Zhao Zhijun, an archaeobotanist at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences’s Institute of Archaeology in Beijing, who was not involved in the study. Arqueotrop_University of São Paulo Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Researchers collecting soil samples bearing rice phytoliths at the Monte Castelo archaeological site in Brazil. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The discovery “was a wonderful surprise,” Iriarte says. His team was looking for hints of cassava domestication and for clues to when maize farming spread to the Amazon. But in sifting the soil samples, Ph.D. student Lautaro Hilbert noticed the unusual abundance of rice phytoliths. Another remarkable aspect is that the Monte Castelo residents were farming maize and rice simultaneously, says Briana Gross, a plant evolutionary geneticist at the University of Minnesota in Duluth, who was not a member of the team.Iriarte’s group suggests that New World rice cultivation was a response to increasing rainfall at Monte Castelo from 6000 to 4000 years ago that could have expanded wetlands and caused seasonal flooding. Such conditions would be unfavorable for other food resources but suited for the wild Oryza species, prompting farmers to manipulate and ultimately domesticate rice even while they grew maize and other crops, such as squash.The authors suggest that the indigenous population decline and cultural disruption during European colonization was a death knell for domesticated rice in the Americas. Gross suggests that researchers can now look in wild rice populations for genetic traits that early Amazonian farmers bred for; if these persist, they might be exploited for improving modern cultivated varieties.last_img read more

How to evaluate computers that dont quite exist

first_img By Adrian ChoJun. 26, 2019 , 8:00 AM Rigetti Computing Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) COMPANY/UNIVERSITYCOMPUTER TYPENUMBER OF QUBITSPREFERRED METRIC COMPANY/UNIVERSITYGoogleCOMPUTER TYPESuper-conducting NUMBER OF QUBITS72PREFERRED METRICQuantum supremacy COMPANY/UNIVERSITYIBMCOMPUTER TYPESuper-conducting NUMBER OF QUBITS20PREFERRED METRICQuantum volume COMPANY/UNIVERSITYRigetti ComputingCOMPUTER TYPESuper-conducting NUMBER OF QUBITS16PREFERRED METRICQuantum advantage COMPANY/UNIVERSITYUniversity of MarylandCOMPUTER TYPETrapped ionsNUMBER OF QUBITS5PREFERRED METRICBenchmark comparison Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A conventional computer manipulates bits of information, encoded in transistors that can be switched on or off to represent zero or one. A qubit, however, can be set to zero and one simultaneously, say, by encoding it in an ion that can spin down for zero, up for one, or both ways at once. Qubits enable the machine to process many inputs simultaneously instead of one at a time. But the machine’s real power comes not through that massive parallelism, but in problems where possible solutions can be encoded in quantum waves that slosh among the qubits. The waves then interfere so that wrong solutions wash out and the right one emerges.A quantum computer would be able to, for example, crack internet encryption schemes based on the factoring of huge numbers—a tough problem for a classical computer. But solving such problems would require 100,000 qubits and the means to correct errors in the delicate quantum waves. Such machines are decades away, researchers say. But quantum computers with even a few dozen noisy qubits will soon best conventional computers at certain tasks, developers say, and they’re searching for the metrics to prove it. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe How to evaluate computers that don’t quite exist Email To gauge the performance of a supercomputer, computer scientists turn to a standard tool: a set of algorithms called LINPACK that tests how fast the machine solves problems with huge numbers of variables. For quantum computers, which might one day solve certain problems that overwhelm conventional computers, no such benchmarking standard exists.One reason is that the computers, which aim to harness the laws of quantum mechanics to accelerate certain computations, are still rudimentary, with radically different designs contending. In some, the quantum bits, or qubits, needed for computation are embodied in the spin of strings of trapped ions, whereas others rely on patches of superconducting metal resonating with microwaves. Comparing the embryonic architectures “is sort of like visiting a nursery school to decide which of the toddlers will become basketball stars,” says Scott Aaronson, a computer scientist at the University of Texas in Austin.Yet researchers are making some of their first attempts to take the measure of quantum computers. Last week, Margaret Martonosi, a computer scientist at Princeton University, and colleagues presented a head-to-head comparison of quantum computers from IBM, Rigetti Computing in Berkeley, California, and the University of Maryland (UMD) in College Park. The UMD machine, which uses trapped ions, ran a majority of 12 test algorithms more accurately than the other superconducting machines, the team reported at the International Symposium on Computer Architecture in Phoenix. Christopher Monroe, a UMD physicist and founder of the company IonQ, predicts such comparisons will become the standard. “These toy algorithms give you a simple answer—did it work or not?” But even Martonosi warns against making too much of the tests. In fact, the analysis underscores how hard it is to compare quantum computers—which leaves room for designers to choose metrics that put their machines in a favorable light. A quantum leap With a quantum computer that relies on a superconducting chip, Rigetti Computing is seeking an application that will give it a practical advantage over conventional computers. Other companies are pushing other metrics to gauge progress. Quantum computers rely on superconducting chips like this one from Rigetti Computing in Berkeley, California. Solving a problem that a conventional computer cannot—so-called quantum supremacy—is one well-publicized metric. “It’s a ‘Hello world!’ project that shows your quantum computer works,” says John Martinis, a physicist in Santa Barbara, California, who leads Google’s efforts to achieve supremacy on a machine with 72 superconducting qubits.The problem Google researchers have chosen is exceedingly abstract. Essentially, they program the quantum computer to repeatedly perform a random set of operations on the qubits. Thanks to quantum interference, the machine should spit out certain strings of zeros and ones with greater probability than others, instead of producing all strings with equal probabilities, as it would if there were no interference. What’s more, predicting this exact distribution of outcomes overwhelms classical computers once the number of qubits climbs too high. So if Google researchers can measure that telltale distribution for their 72-qubit machine, then, in a sense, it will have achieved quantum supremacy by calculating something a conventional computer cannot. However, the arcane exercise won’t usher in practical quantum computers, says Greg Kuperberg, a mathematician at the University of California, Davis. “It’s supremacy to do something completely useless.”In contrast, researchers at Rigetti aim to show that a quantum computer can perform some useful task more accurately, faster, or more cheaply than conventional computers—a metric they call quantum advantage. “What we want are things that put us on the shortest path to commercial value,” says Chad Rigetti, a physicist and founder of the startup. For example, he says, a quantum computer might be ideal for modeling the complex interplay of financial assets in a hedge fund.In September 2018, Rigetti pledged $1 million to the first user who achieves quantum advantage on its publicly available machines. The current version has 16 superconducting qubits. Because the measure includes factors like cost, quantum advantage is not so tightly defined, says Aram Harrow, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “If it’s a little vague, that’s not bad for Rigetti,” Harrow says.IBM researchers have defined a metric, called quantum volume, that measures a quantum computer’s performance without comparing it to a conventional machine. It involves testing a quantum computer using random calculations like those Google is using. And it depends on both the number of qubits and the number of computational cycles a machine can handle before its quantum states fuzz out.Using a machine with 20 superconducting qubits, IBM scientists have reached a quantum volume of 16 and aim to double it every year, says Jay Gambetta, a physicist at IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. Breakthrough applications will follow naturally, he says. “I don’t think that supremacy is something you shoot for. It’s something we’ll recognize once we’ve passed on to bigger and bigger things.”Then there are head-to-head comparisons like Martonosi’s. In her test, the 5-qubit ion-based machine solved most test problems correctly 90% of the time, compared with 50% or less for superconducting-qubit machines. That difference reflects the current states of the technologies and not their potential, Martonosi says. For example, in a superconducting machine each qubit interacts only with its neighbors, but every ion in the UMD machine interacts with all the others, giving it an edge. Bigger ion-based machines won’t share that advantage, however.Martonosi says such comparisons show that all the quantum computers performed significantly better when programmed to account for differences in qubit noise and connectivity. “Across quite a wide range of [hardware] implementations, this appears to work,” she says. “That’s quite exciting.”Harrow questions how useful any of the current metrics will prove in the long run. The main challenge in quantum computing remains finding a technology that will scale up to thousands of qubits, he says. “These metrics are only loosely related to the scaling question.”last_img read more

Top stories tarantula poaching a geological Google and fixing health care in

first_img Email (left to right): CHIEN LEE; BRITISH GEOLOGICAL SURVEY; RIJASOLO Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Top stories: tarantula poaching, a ‘geological Google,’ and fixing health care in Madagascar By Alex FoxMar. 1, 2019 , 1:30 PM This amazing blue tarantula is a new spider species—but did researchers break the law when they studied it?A female of the world’s newest tarantula species has electric-blue legs and a creamy toffee body. She’s native to the state of Sarawak in Malaysia and would fit nicely in your palm. Spider enthusiasts were thrilled when the new species came to light. But its emergence also highlights a growing illegal trade in tarantulas and researchers’ laissez-faire attitudes about sourcing specimens for study. Earth scientists plan to meld massive databases into a ‘geological Google’ Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The British Geological Survey (BGS) in Nottingham has one of the world’s premier geological collections with roughly 3 million fossils. But this data trove “was not really very useful to anybody,” says Michael Stephenson, a BGS paleontologist. Now, that could change, thanks to a nascent international effort to meld earth science databases into what Stephenson and other backers are describing as a “geological Google.”A prescription for Madagascar’s broken health system: data and a focus on detailsMadagascar, one of the poorest countries in the world, has shockingly high rates of maternal and childhood mortality and malnutrition. Public health experts are convinced the interventions that bring in the most international dollars, such as bed nets for malaria, are simply not enough. Now, a recently founded nongovernmental organization called PIVOT seeks to use rigorous data gathering and analysis to help create an affordable and effective health care system that could ultimately be scaled up to cover all of Madagascar and, perhaps, be adapted for other countries.New way to turn carbon dioxide into coal could ‘rewind the emissions clock’If humans hope to limit climate change to just 2°C of warming, we’ve got a lot of work to do, scientists say: reducing emissions, planting trees, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the skies with the latest technologies. Now, a new process can convert gaseous CO2—the product of burning fossil fuels—into solid carbon at room temperature, using only a trickle of electricity. But getting it to work on a planetwide scale will be a formidable challenge.This celebrity cat has broken the internet. Now, we have its genomeCats may rule the internet, but few felines have achieved the online fame of Lil Bub. Discovered as a feral kitten outside Bloomington, Indiana, in 2011, she had a series of congenital abnormalities: extra toes, shorter-than-usual limbs, and a tongue that perpetually hangs out of her mouth. This week, geneticists reported they sequenced Lil Bub’s whole genome, discovering the genetic basis of her much-loved idiosyncrasies.last_img read more

Controversial Viking Warrior Remains Proved to be Female

first_imgWhen the remains of a buried Viking, long thought to be a man, were announced as belonging to a 10th century female warrior in 2017, some expressed skepticism. Or as one scientist put it, there was “unprecedented public debate.” But a study released in late February 2019 has verified the integrity of the tests that ruled the gender as being female. The individual most definitely had XX chromosomes, scientists say who conducted a final round of tests. After extracting the 1,000-year-old warrior’s mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, the researchers found no traces of Y chromosome.This Viking was buried with weapons and two horses, leading archaeologists on what is now known as the Swedish island of Bjorko to assume this was a male warrior who led others.Viking warrior femaleThe original discovery was made in 1878 by archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe in Birka, a Viking settlement that flourished from about 750 to 950. The Birka site was filled with several cemeteries containing thousands of human remains and artifacts.This five-foot-six-inch body was buried in an underground wooden chamber, dressed in Eurasian steppe-style clothing. “The remains of a mare and a stallion, their legs tucked under them, rested at one end of the chamber,” according to Live Science.“Sharp weapons surrounded the deceased: a sheathed sword, an axe, a fighting knife, two spears, two shields, a quiver of 25 armor-piercing arrows and a small iron knife.”The five-foot-six-inch body was buried in an underground wooden chamber, dressed in Eurasian steppe-style clothingIn the journal Antiquity, the researchers responded to critics of the 2017 report, saying that they analyzed the correct skeleton and only one set of human remains were in the grave.Related Video: 10 Viking Wrods that have Invaded our Language:“The simple and secure conclusion is that we have the right individual, who was buried alone, and that this person has been proven to be biologically female,” they explained.Shieldmaiden Valkyrie by Peter Nicolai ArboThe original archaeologist, Stolpe, assumed that a grave filled with so many weapons, and absent of any female-associated artifacts (such as jewelry or weaving equipment), belonged to a man. But in the 1970s, scientists examining the bones began to theorize that the buried Viking was a woman.“The warrior woman has long been part of the Viking image, with a pedigree that extends from the Valkyries of Old Norse prose and poetry to modern media entertainment,” wrote the study authors in Antiquity. “Until recently, however, actual Viking Age evidence for such individuals has been sparse.”Modern replica of a Viking KnarrA new understanding is forming of gender and military leadership in the Viking age. “It’s actually a woman, somewhere over the age of 30 and fairly tall too, measuring around 170 centimeters [5 feet 6 inches],” Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, an archaeologist at Uppsala University, told The Local.Viking Shieldmaiden reenactment“Aside from the complete warrior equipment buried along with her – a sword, an axe, a spear, armour-piercing arrows, a battle knife, shields, and two horses – she had a board game in her lap, or more of a war-planning game used to try out battle tactics and strategies, which indicates she was a powerful military leader,” she said. “She’d most likely planned, led and taken part in battles.”There is a reason to believe other women led military groups and were honored in this way, despite the modern skepticism and backlash. Some doubters said the scientists made a mistake and there was more than one body buried. There were even accusations that this Viking was a transgender and the scientists got it wrong.The Landing of the Vikings by Arthur C. Michael (1919)The original 2017 researchers said, “In the weeks following the online publication of our article, the research was covered by more than 130 international news agencies, and was discussed across some 2,200 individual online accounts, accessed by millions of followers.”Read another story from us: Five of the Greatest Viking Champions“Altmetric ranked our article as the forty-third most frequently accessed scientific paper of some 2.2 million published globally during 2017, and placed it at 265 of the 11.7 million outputs ever scored by them (as of early September 2018).”“This level of interest took us by surprise and raises the important question: why did this one single grave generate such global attention?”Some say the warrior was  misidentified as biologically male based on past archaeologists’ assignment of gender on the basis of a grave’s contents. Now scientists use DNA and bone analysis.last_img read more

Prominent businessman highlights social and historic significance of new movie theatre

first_imgShareTweetSharePinInside the Emerald Movie TheatreProprietor of Prevo Cinemall, Norris Prevost has said that the new Emerald Movie Theatre is a major contribution to the social and entertainment life in Dominica.Prevost told Dominica News Online (DNO) in a recent interview, that the theatre is of world class standard and congratulated the young entrepreneurs who have ventured to reopen it.Dominica’s first cinema (Carib Cinema) was established in the 1950’s but closed down after Hurricane David in 1979. It was reopened in 1994 but closed again in 2007.“Let me congratulate Emerald Movies for doing a remarkable job in re-establishing the cinema at the Prevo Cinemall. This is part of the original Carib Cinema that was established in the 1950’s. When my group bought the Carib Cinema building, we transformed it into the Prevo Cinemall,” Prevo said. “One of our goals was to ensure that we maintained a cinema in the property because we considered the Carib Cinema an important part of the heritage of Dominica. The Carib Cinema is an example of what you call sustainable restoration.”The theatre seats about 180 peoplePrevost said the new Emerald Movie Theatre is a major contribution to social life in Dominica. “It also is a positive, bold step by young Dominican entrepreneurs. From a business point of view, it’s a great example for business and young businesses should take examples and we, as Dominicans, should big up our young entrepreneurs for some of the businesses that they are doing and we should do everything that we can to patronize them and also to care for that cinema,” the veteran businessman advised.He continued, “The directors of Emerald Movies meet that bench mark of young men who could be considered model young men in the community and seem to be pitching for high standards. I’m excited about the way they have refurbished and created a whole brand new look in the cinema. From a physical point of view, the new Emerald Movie Theatre is of world class standard, it’s of a standard that would meet in any city in North America.”Prevost added that it is his hope that the entrepreneurs of the theatre will continue to succeed and grow in providing more entertainment businesses for Dominica.“It’s a big step they have taken. My hope and my dream is to see them grow to the level where they can multiply; they can open additional screens or they can build their own cinema. That’s what I would like to see – grow their cinema business to the point where there are business and moral examples in terms of entertainment.”He said both young and old cinema goers are excited and he believes that once Emerald Movies continues at the standard they have begun, the venture is going to be a successful addition to entertainment in Dominica.Prevost encouraged Dominicans to support this “worthwhile experience for a reasonable price” and include it as part of their regular lifestyle.Emerald Movies snack counter Ticket boothlast_img read more

Podcast a big increase in monkey research and an overhaul for the

first_img A new report suggests a big increase in the use of monkeys in laboratory experiments in the United States in 2017. Online News Editor David Grimm joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss which areas of research are experiencing this rise and the possible reasons behind it.Also this week, host Meagan Cantwell talks with staff writer Adrian Cho about a final push to affix the metric system’s measures to physical constants instead of physical objects. That means the perfectly formed 1-kilogram cylinder known as Le Grand K is no more; it also means that the meter, the ampere, and other units of measure are now derived using complex calculations and experiments. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Peter Nijenhuis/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Peter Nijenhuis/Flickr last_img read more

Karnataka crisis LIVE Backchannel talks yield result as rebel MLA Nagaraj decides

first_img facebook twitter whatsapp Rebel MLA Nagaraj with Congress leader Siddaramaiah and CM Kumaraswamy. (Source: ANI)Karnataka crisis LIVE news update:  In a breather to the beleaguered Congress-JDS government, rebel MLA MTB Nagaraj said that he has decided to stay back in the Congress. “I had given resignation from MLA’s post. All the leaders are asking me to stay in Congress since morning. I have decided to stay in the party,” he was quoted as saying by ANI.Hectic negotiations had been going on at Congress Legislature Party (CLP) leader Siddaramaiah’s residence to placate Nagaraj. ” We will try to convince Chikkaballapur MLA K Sudhakar and both of us will take our resignation back,” Nagaraj added.Earlier in the day, state BJP chief B S Yeddyurappa made it clear that his party will press Kumaraswamy to seek trust vote in the Assembly on Monday, asserting that the Congress-JD(S) coalition government has lost majority and its collapse was imminent.As the crisis that threatens the survival of the 13-month-old government stretched into the eighth day, five more rebel Karnataka Congress MLAs approached the Supreme Court today, saying that the Speaker was not accepting their resignations. The MLAs also alleged that they “are being forced to support the government on the threat of disqualification”. If all the resignations are accepted, the coalition’s numbers in the 224-member House will fall to 101 compared to the BJP’s 105 MLAs and the support of two Independents. The BJP can win a confidence vote if at least 11 resignations are accepted.Live BlogFollow the latest development in Karnataka Here Who is MTB Nagaraj Nagaraj is a wealthy landholder in real-estate businessman and one of the richest MLAs in Karnataka. A member of OBC Kuruba community, he is considered a close aide of Siddaramaiah. He had earlier threatened to rebel against the coalition last year and was inducted into the state cabinet in December 2018 at the instance of Siddaramaiah.  Read :  Karnataka’s 16 rebel MLAs: Who they are  facebook twitter whatsapp We will get most of the MLAs when vote of confidence is moved: Siddaramaiah Ahead of the floor test, Karnataka Congress Legislature Party (CLP) leader Siddharamaiah said, ” we will get most of the MLAs when the vote of confidence is moved.”  MP CM Kamal Nath to reach Bangalore on Sunday Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Kamal Nath is expected to be in Bangaluru on Sunday in an effort to woo back the rebel MLAs to its fold ahead of a possible trial of strength in the Karnataka assembly, news agency ANI reported. facebook twitter whatsapp Karnataka CM HD Kumaraswamy arrives at CLP leader Siddaramaiah’s residence in Bengaluru. pic.twitter.com/az9yUNL3SG— ANI (@ANI) July 13, 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp 18:19 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 Ready to face floor test: Yeddyurappa A day after Karnataka Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy sought a trust vote in the floor of the Assembly, BJP president BS Yeddyurappa Saturday said that they are ready to face the no-confidence motion. “We have no objection to no-confidence motion. We will wait until Monday. On Monday, we are ready to face the no-confidence Motion,” said Yeddyurappa. Read more  19:09 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 18:17 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 20:40 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp 20:43 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 Kumaraswamy meets rebel MLA MTB Nagaraj Karnataka CM HD Kumaraswamy meets rebel Congress MLA MTB Nagaraj at Congress Legislature Party (CLP) leader Siddaramaiah’s residence in Bengaluru. Congress leader Zameer Ahmed khan also present. Source: ANI By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 13, 2019 11:31:12 pm 22:31 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 Negotiations are going on, Siddaramaiah spoke good things: Nagaraj On coming out from Siddaramaiahs house, Nagaraj said, “Negotiations are going on. He (Siddaramaiah) has spoken good things.” Asked whether he has changed his mind, he said: “We all are trying for it only.” Later, Nagaraj returned to Siddaramaiah’s residence, where chief minister H D Kumaraswamy joined the negotiations.  facebook twitter whatsapp 22:01 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 Karnataka Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy. (File)16 Congress and JD(S) MLAs have quit in all since July 1, the Speaker had rejected the resignations of 10 MLAs on the ground that they were not in the correct format.The Congress-JD(S) coalition, however, hopes to wean back at least six rebel MLAs, prevent more exits and get a few BJP MLAs to stay away from the House for the trust vote to prove its majority, said JD(S) sources. Kumaraswamy expressed confidence that he would win the trust vote. Rebel Karnataka MLAs head to Shirdi for visit to Saibaba temple Fourteen rebel MLAs from Karnataka, who have been camping in Mumbai since the last week, Saturday headed to Shirdi. The rebel legislators of the Congress-JD(S) will pay obeisance to Saibaba at the temple in Shirdi in Ahmednagar district. “The MLAs left for Shirdi in a private plane. They will return later in the day,” sources said. 18:44 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 Karnataka CM Kumaraswamy arrives at Siddaramaiah’s residence Sources in JD(S) said Kumaraswamy is in direct talks with at least four Congress legislators, who have resigned, and is hopeful that they would withdraw their resignation, reported PTI Rebel MLA Nagaraj withdraws resignation ” We will try to convince Chikkaballapur MLA Sudhakar and both of us will take our resignation back,” said Nagaraj.Congress MLA MTB Nagaraj: I and Sudhakar had given resignation from MLA’s post. All the leaders are asking me to stay in Congress since morning. I have decided to stay in the party. #Karnataka pic.twitter.com/67Pt8VBlAA— ANI (@ANI) July 13, 2019 19:58 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp 20:19 (IST) 13 Jul 2019 Karnataka monsoon session: Two Independent MLAs seek seats on Oppn side in Assembly Two Independent MLAs, who recently withdrew support to the Congress-JD(S) coalition government in Karnataka and sided with the BJP, have written to the Assembly speaker requesting him to allot them seats on the opposition side in the House. In separate letters to the speaker, both H Nagesh (Mulabagilu MLA) and R Shankar (Ranebennur MLA) stated that they had withdrawn support to the ruling coalition and requested him to make seating arrangements for them on the opposition side in the Assembly. The monsoon session of the Karnataka Assembly began on Friday and is scheduled to end on July 26. 5 Comment(s)last_img read more

iOS Users May Regret Going to 11

first_imgThe hardware enabling the iPhone X’s Face ID technology is the A11 Bionic GPU, LaPorta noted. It requires a lot of power, which could explain the big discrepancy in the battery decay rate.With iOS 10, the battery took an average of 240 minutes to drain to zero, while with iOS 11 it took an average 96 minutes to reach zero, based on an analysis of 50,000 heavy iPhone and iPad users who used the same devices with both systems, LaPorta wrote.Reverting to the previous version of iOS could leave users vulnerable to hack attacks, she cautioned, recommending that users who choose to do so limit the number of apps that refresh in the background, as well as the number of apps that can access their location. David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times. Device Dominance Blowback over Apple’s iOS 11 upgrade has been increasing, despite an update that was supposed to solve battery drainage issues and a large number of other glitches but apparently has not done the job.Apple officially launched iOS 11 on September 19, but problems quickly became apparent, prompting the company to roll out iOS 11.0.1 just a week later.iOS 11 provides immersive augmented reality functionality to iPhones and iPads, as well as a redesigned App Store, enhanced Siri, a Do Not Disturb feature for drivers, and the ability to share playlists in Apple Music.However, iPhone users have reported a host of problems with the new operating system, including a high rate of battery drainage, installation problems, slow speeds, and problems with WiFi and Bluetooth. The issues are so prevalent that many users reportedly have reverted to iOS 10.3.3.iOS updates typically run into issues due to Spotlight re-indexing, according to Wandera La Porta, content marketing lead at Wandera.However, the scanning technology used for the new Animoji and iPhone X Face ID relies heavily on the camera, which is known to suck battery life, she wrote in an online post. The operating system glitches and battery life issues could prove to be a long-term problem for Apple if the company doesn’t adequately resolve performance issues, said Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.”Individually this would be painful, but the firm should be able to weather it,” he told TechNewsWorld, “but cumulatively, with the iPhone 8 quality issues, the iPhone X component shortages, and the lack of time to recover before year end, this could be ugly for the company.”Apple appears vulnerable, and Samsung’s flagship Galaxy line might be able to steal some market share as a result, Enderle suggested.Ironically, it was Samsung that went through a much more troubling quality control issue last year, when its Galaxy Note7 was banned from flights and all units ultimately were recalled after lithium ion batteries in some of the devices caught fire and even exploded.”Apple may have bitten off more than it can chew, but they have done it in the past and that didn’t hurt them in the long run,” said Jeff Kagan, an independent telecom analyst.Battery life and other OS upgrade issues turn off customers, but Apple has such a loyal following that it’s likely to weather the storm, he told TechNewsWorld.After updating his iPhone 6s to iOS 11, Tirias Research Principal Analyst Kevin Krewell ran into some battery drainage issues, he told TechNewsWorld.The toll on battery life seems to get worse when using LTE, he said. After turning off a number of notifications, specifically targeting Facebook and Twitter, performance seemed to improve, Krewell said.”I suspect there are some settings that Apple changed for better performance and responsiveness that had a negative impact on battery life,” he said, noting that he has since received the 11.0.1 update, which is supposed to address battery life issues.center_img Cumulative Effect Apple has a lot at stake. The iPhone has a U.S. installed base of about 141 million units as of July 1, up from 136 million units at the end of March and compared with 124 million units from a year ago, according to data from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners.The iPhone 7 and 7 Plus accounted for about 48 million units, or 34 percent of the total installed base, CIRP data show. The 6s and 6s Plus accounted for 47 million, or 33 percent, and the 6 and the 6 Plus accounted for 39 million units, or 27 percent of the installed base.Growth in the U.S. installed base has been slowing down, as nearly half of the U.S. adult and teen population have at least one of these devices, and fewer device users are willing to switch operating systems, noted Michael Levin, partner at CIRP. Power Drainlast_img read more

Caltech researchers develop two new illusions with audiovisual postdictive effects

first_img Source:http://www.caltech.edu/news/time-traveling-illusion-tricks-brain-84009 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 10 2018We experience the world through our senses, a constant torrent of sights, sounds, smells, and more. Our brains take these signals and process them, giving rise to our individual perceptions of the world. But sometimes our senses play tricks on us, notably in the case of perceptual illusions.Now, Caltech researchers have developed two new illusions that reveal how the senses can influence each other–in particular, how sound can give rise to visual illusions. These illusions occur so quickly that they illustrate a phenomenon called postdiction (as opposed to prediction) in which a stimulus that occurs later can retroactively affect our perceptions of an earlier event.The Caltech work is among the first to show this kind of time-traveling illusion across multiple senses.The work was done in the laboratory of Shinsuke Shimojo, Gertrude Baltimore Professor of Experimental Psychology and affiliated faculty member of the Tianqiao and Chrissy Chen Institute for Neuroscience at Caltech. A paper describing the research appears in the October 3 issue of the journal PLOS ONE.”Illusions are a really interesting window into the brain,” says first author Noelle Stiles (PhD ’15), a visitor in biology and biological engineering and a postdoctoral scholar-research associate at USC. “By investigating illusions, we can study the brain’s decision-making process. For example, how does the brain determine reality with information from multiple senses that is at times noisy and conflicting? The brain uses assumptions about the environment to solve this problem. When these assumptions happen to be wrong, illusions can occur as the brain tries to make the best sense of a confusing situation. We can use these illusions to unveil the underlying inferences that the brain makes.”The two illusions in this study were developed to illustrate how stimuli that occur later can affect the perception of stimuli that have already occurred. Postdictive processing has been demonstrated within individual senses, but this work focuses on how the phenomenon can bridge multiple senses. The key to both of the new illusions is that the audio and visual stimuli occur rapidly, in under 200 milliseconds (one-fifth of a second). The brain, trying to make sense of this barrage of information, synthesizes the stimuli from both senses to determine the experience, using postdiction to do so.The first illusion is called the Illusory Rabbit. To produce the illusion, first a short beep and a quick flash are played nearly simultaneously on a computer, with the flash appearing at the left side of the screen. Next, 58 milliseconds after the first beep, a lone beep is played. Finally, 58 milliseconds after the second beep, a second nearly simultaneous beep-flash pair occurs, but with the flash appearing on the right side of the screen. The beep location is always central and does not move. Though only two flashes are played, most people viewing the illusion perceive three flashes, with an illusory flash coinciding with the second beep and appearing to be located in the center of the screen.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustThe fact that the illusory flash is perceived in between the left and right flashes is the key evidence that the brain is using postdictive processing.”When the final beep-flash pair is later presented, the brain assumes that it must have missed the flash associated with the unpaired beep and quite literally makes up the fact that there must have been a second flash that it missed,” explains Stiles. “This already implies a postdictive mechanism at work. But even more importantly, the only way that you could perceive the shifted illusory flash would be if the information that comes later in time–the final beep-flash combination–is being used to reconstruct the most likely location of the illusory flash as well.”The second illusion is called the Invisible Rabbit. In this related illusion, three flashes are shown on the screen, the first on the left, the second in the middle, and finally the third on the right, with only the first and third flashes coinciding with beeps. In this case, most people do not see the second flash–the one without a corresponding sound–at all. The absence of the second beep leads the brain to decide after the fact that there actually was no flash, even though it was in fact present.By showing that a sound can excite a visual illusion, the researchers have uncovered new clues as to how the brain combines the senses over space and time to generate an integrated sense of perception.”The significance of this study is twofold,” says Shimojo. “First, it generalizes postdiction as a key process in perceptual processing for both a single sense and multiple senses. Postdiction may sound mysterious, but it is not–one must consider how long it takes the brain to process earlier visual stimuli, during which time subsequent stimuli from a different sense can affect or modulate the first. The second significance is that these illusions are among the very rare cases where sound affects vision, not vice versa, indicating dynamic aspects of neural processing that occur across space and time. These new illusions will enable researchers to identify optimal parameters for multisensory integration, which is necessary for both the design of ideal sensory aids and optimal training for low-vision individuals.” This audio and visual illusion illustrates the phenomenon of postdiction: when a stimulus presented later in time affects the perception of a stimulus presented earlier. In this case, a rapid series of beeps and flashes leads the brain to believe it perceived a flash when in fact there was not one. Credit: Caltech / Shimojo laboratorylast_img read more

Exercise hormone can prevent Alzheimers finds study

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJan 8 2019According to a large worldwide study, the hormone that is produced in the body during exercise called irisin, can prevent and delay the onset of mental faculty decline and Alzheimer’s disease. The results of the study were published in the latest issue of the journal Nature Medicine. Irisin, a cleaved version of FNDC5. Promotes conversion of white fat tissue to brown. Image Credit: ibreakstock / Shutterstock Irisin is produced within the muscles during intense exercise and physical activity. It was six years back and was found to be instrumental in burning fat. Irisin has been on the cards for obesity researchers worldwide for its potential to help reduce fat. In these latest studies on mice and humans, researchers have found that irisin helps protect against mental decline that is commonly seen with aging process. This study by Fernana de Felice at the Federal University of Rio de Janerio and colleagues, proves the adage the regular exercise keeps the body as well as mind healthy.Neurobiologist Professor Ottavio Arancio, from the Columbia University and this study’s lead researcher said, “Irisin could comprise an attractive novel therapy aimed to prevent dementia in patients at risk.” He said that irisin can delay the “progression in patients at the later stages – including those who can no longer exercise.” He explained, “Many patients with dementia are disabled due to other age-related conditions or co-morbidities – for example arthritis, heart disease, obesity, visual problems, depression – that preclude them from engaging in regular physical exercise. Therefore, the development of alternative approaches that build on the beneficial effects of exercise in the brain may benefit those patients.”In this study the team studied a gene called the FNDC5. This gene regulates the formation of irisin. They switched off this gene in the lab mice. This effectively stopped the production of irisin. These animals showed problems of learning and memory progressively, they noted. The switched on the FNDC5 gene in the mice to see that the brain cells had restored function. The team also studied brain tissues and blood and spinal fluids of people who had died of dementia. They compared this with blood samples and spinal fluid samples of living healthy matches who did not have dementia. The team found that patients with Alzheimer’s gradually lose the synapses of connections of the brain and this causes loss of memory. Irisin is found to restore these synapses.Related StoriesResearchers discover new therapeutic target for treatment of Alzheimer’s diseaseExercise during pregnancy can promote bone health of both mother and childCould hormone therapy for prostate cancer increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease?According to Dr James Pickett, head of research at Alzheimer’s Society, “Although this study was only in mice, it adds to mounting evidence of the relationship between lifestyle factors, like physical fitness, and dementia. This is a promising avenue for more research and potentially new therapies in future. We know that exercise can decrease a person’s risk of developing dementia, but still have lots to learn about its effect on cognitive decline – for example, we need to know how this hormone gets into the brain, how it works, whether it is effective in people, and whether it affects men and women in the same way – which is why we’re funding a long-term study of 700 middle-aged people at risk of dementia to better understand these links.” He explained that there have been no new drugs for dementia in the last one and half decades and this study can show a new avenue of research in tackling dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. “We know that exercise not only helps people with dementia to manage certain side-effects but also reduces the risk of developing the condition, which gives us all more motivation for those New Year’s Resolutions to get fit and healthy,” he said. Rosa Sancho at the charity Alzheimer’s Research UK added, “We know that physical activity is linked to better brain health as we age, and this research highlights a biological mechanism that may contribute to this beneficial effect.” At present 35 million people worldwide who are suffering from age related dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.Prof Arancio said, “Defective brain hormonal signalling has been associated with Alzheimer’s disease, a disorder characterised by synapse and memory failure. By showing irisin is an important mediator of the beneficial effects of exercise in Alzheimer’s disease models our findings place it as a novel agent capable of opposing synapse failure and memory impairment.” He added, “Bolstering brain irisin levels – either pharmacologically or through exercise – may thus constitute a novel therapeutic strategy to protect and repair synapse function and prevent cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease.”center_img Source:https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-018-0275-4last_img read more

Transmitting measuring data wireless in real time

A sensor transfers the vibration spectra of the blisk via 5G with sub millisecond latency to a software. Credit: Fraunhofer IPT Explore further Sensors continuously record measurements in plant and machinery to check that everything is running according to plan and to enable any errors in the industrial production environment to be recognized at an early stage. However, as a rule, evaluation of the data is decentralized and takes place after a time lag. In contrast to this, the 5G wireless standard permits direct, wireless measurement in real time. Fraunhofer in Aachen has teamed up with Ericsson to offer a unique test environment for 5G applications in industry. The partners will be using the example of aero-engine component manufacture to demonstrate live, for the first time, the opportunities provided by the technology at the Hanover Fair from 23– 27 April 2018. Citation: Transmitting measuring data wireless in real time (2018, April 3) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-transmitting-wireless-real.html Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Virtual twin controls production The production of aero engines is a complex and expensive business. The whole manufacturing chain of a compressor component known as Blisk (blade-integrated disk) can cost up to 200,000 EURO. The highest levels of safety and quality standards must be observed and computer-controlled machine tools have to be programmed to ensure that the components are produced exactly as stipulated in the design plans. Sensors mounted on plant and machinery monitor the production process continuously. “Yet there is always a certain element of residual risk because the quality analysis is dencentralized with a considerable time lag. The natural frequencies of the thin-walled blades present a particular problem in production as any uncontrolled vibration has adverse effects on the quality, which have to be corrected via time-consuming manual operations following the production,” declared Dr. Sascha Gierlings, Head of Prototype Manufacturing at the Fraunhofer-Institute for Production Technology IPT in Aachen.Unique test environment in AachenA combination of the latest sensor technology and rapid data transfer rates like those provided by the future mobile communication standard 5G seems to be a promising solution to this problem. In the specific case of blisk production, the Fraunhofer IPT has attached a specially-developed sensor directly to the component. This transfers the vibration spectra of the blisk via 5G with sub millisecond latency to software which recognizes immediately whether the vibrations exceed the permitted maximum or have reached critical frequencies and adapts the production process accordingly without delay. An additional advantage: The rapid data transfer allows a digital twin, the virtual reflection of a component to be generated. This twin helps to answer important questions relating to the production process at the computer, before the process begins.The live transfer of component data was developed by the Research Institute in Aachen in collaboration with Ericsson, the Swedish technology provider in the High Performance Center Networked, Adaptive Production. The partners will be unveiling their solution to the public for the first time in a live demo at the Hanover Fair at the end of April: The researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute will transfer in real time the vibration spectrum of a milled blisk via 5G technology directly from the sensor to a display unit. “We hope that our appearance at the fair will encourage all interested companies to visit us in Aachen so that they can profit from the unique test environment we have here for 5G applications in industry,” adds Niels König, Manager of the Production Metrology Department and Coordinator of 5G activities at the Fraunhofer IPT, addressing potential clients directly. “Blisk production is only one of many conceivable fields of application. Its complexity, however, makes it particularly suitable for use as a demonstrator.” “Examples of applications such as Blisk production highlight the fact that there is no way round 5G for those striving to future-proof their production,” explains Stefan Koetz, CEO of Ericsson GmbH. “Of course, when you are creating solutions to connectivity as part of Industrie 4.0 it is essential to work side-by-side with a solid partner with a track record of integrity as well as with unsurpassed standards in quality and reliability. Our mission statement in a nutshell.”5G from 2020Plans are already well under way to introduce 5G as the new mobile communication standard by 2020. In addition to low latency times, it promises high data transfer rates of up to 10,000 megabits per second and allows for numerous devices to be operated simultaneously in closely linked small radio cells. For the first time ever, 5G technology thereby accommodates the use of wireless sensor connections for real time data analyses and adaptive control of production processes with short reaction times. “The greatest challenge facing mobile communications providers from now until 2020 will be to continue to reduce the size of transmission units. From laptop to smartphone or chip size, if possible. Our mission is to develop the measuring and control technology required,” is how König sums up the next steps in the development process. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more